Homeward Bound, Part 3 – The Big Apple

It was time for the Big Apple and Hell’s Gate. But before we could even anticipate that leg of our journey, the engine would not start. That’s a BIG problem when you have no sails. For the past three mornings, the engine has gotten more and more sluggish; like it just did not want to get up in the morning. Once started, it ran perfectly. Fortunately, Captain Al has been trying different things to diagnose the problem – Batteries? Starter? Solenoid? Seems like it is the solenoid. He thinks he can get it to turn over and start the two more times that we need in order to get home.
With a sigh of relief (that would be me, he wasn’t worried), we headed out of Sandy Hook and headed for the Verranzano Narrows Bridge, the entrance to New York Harbor.

The Verranzano Narrows Bridge ahead appears in the distant haze.

The Verranzano Narrows Bridge ahead appears in the distant haze.

We found a little flag pole for the bow so we were able to fly our Shenny burgee!

We found a little flag pole for the bow so we were able to fly our Shenny burgee!

I thought this might be a boring part of the journey since we went through New York last September, but it was still a thrill. The harbor seemed much busier than last time.  Ferries, barges, tankers, tour boats, tugs, helicopters, seaplanes,  sailboats and powerboats. IF you count the cars we could see on the city expressways, there were things on land, on sea and in the air.

Barges, tankers, tugs, and a curious sailing vessel.

Barges, tankers, tugs, and a curious sailing vessel.

~It was definitely tourist time - lots of tour boats.  ~The Staten Island Ferry is easy to spot on its back and forth trips with that orange color.  ~ A seaplane and many helicopters.

~It was definitely tourist time – lots of tour boats.
~The Staten Island Ferry is easy to spot on its back and forth trips with that orange color.
~ A seaplane and many helicopters.

Here’s a few photos from our northbound trip up the East River. Although I spent two years living in Manhattan back in the 1970’s, I am definitely not a city girl. I will admit that  making this trip on the East River by water, whether it be on a sailboat or a trawler, is special.

Lady Liberty is still a sight to behold.

Lady Liberty is still a sight to behold.

Lower Manhattan, Battery Park

Lower Manhattan, Battery Park

The Brooklyn Bridge

The Brooklyn Bridge

All sizes and shapes of buildings.

All sizes and shapes of buildings.

The United Nations

The United Nations

New York Hospital - my oldest son was born there.

New York Hospital – my oldest son was born there.

And then there was the infamous Hell's Gate. For a brief moment (the blink of an eye) our speed reached 13 knots (lower pic shows the trip log.) I caught 12.3 knots on the chart plotter. At 1600 rpms.

And then there was the infamous Hell’s Gate. For a brief moment (the blink of an eye) our speed reached 13 knots (lower pic shows the trip log.) I caught 12.3 knots on the chart plotter. At 1500 rpms.

Five hours from Sandy Hook to Port Washington. Not bad.

This lighthouse marks the end of the day's journey - turn right after it into Manhasset Bay for Port Washington.

This lighthouse marks the end of the day’s journey – turn right after it into Manhasset Bay for Port Washington.

We did some chores on the boat and dinghied into Port Washington. The Stop & Shop is right across from the dinghy dock – what more could  cruisers want? And a HomeGoods!!! But the best part is the yellow free moorings. 🙂

The website Vesselfinder showed our track from the Verranzo Narrows Bridge all the way through to the mooring in Port Washington.

The website Vesselfinder showed our track from the Verranzo Narrows Bridge all the way through to the mooring in Port Washington. You can even see the beginning of the next day’s track as we left.

Deep int eh aft cockpit locker we found a CQR anchor still wrapped in its shipping material. Never used. Al swapped it out wight he Danforth anchor that was on the bow. Sadly (embarrassingly) there is still only 16 feet of chain on this boat. WE have just got to correct that as soon as possible.

Deep in the aft cockpit locker Al found a CQR anchor still wrapped in its shipping material. Never used. Al swapped it out with the Danforth anchor that was on the bow. Sadly (embarrassingly) there is still only 16 feet of chain on this boat. We have just got to correct that as soon as possible.

We are nearing the end of our delivery voyage. Hopefully only two more days!

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