Hope Town Kids

HT Primary School emblem

Hope Town Primary School

Children are children, no matter where you might be.  They laugh, they play, they cry.  They ask questions, they answer questions, they try your patience and they fill you with joy. They learn from you and they teach you. Marcia and I, both former educators, offered our time and services to the local elementary school, Hope Town Primary School. We didn’t care what we did, just anything that would help the teachers. We did caution the headmaster that we would be “foul weather volunteers” – if the skies are gray, and it is rainy or cold, we will stop by. He did not mind at all and told us to come any time we wanted; they welcome the extra hands. That was my clue that this is very different than our US schools. Back in the States,  we would have forms to complete, interviews, fingerprinting, DCF checks, and so on.

The Hope Town Primary School was founded in 1893 and educates children from kindergarten through sixth grade.

The front has steps down to the lower road.

The front has steps down to the lower road.

The small buildings, attached to each other by decks and stairs, stretch up the hill to the other higher road.

The small buildings, attached to each other by decks and stairs, stretch up the hill to the other higher road.

There are four teachers, and each teaches two grades in the same classroom – “preschool” is 4 and 5 year olds, 1st and 2nd grade are together, as well as 3rd and 4th, and 5th and 6th. Mr. Higgs, the headmaster is also the 5th/6th grade teacher. Other than preschool, each class has about 20-22 students.

Waiting for school to begin

Waiting for school to begin

Headmaster Higgs meets with all students outside for morning meeting.

Headmaster Higgs meets with all students outside for morning meeting.

“Miss Dee” teaches the 1st and 2nd graders. She lives on Lubbers Quarters, an island just south of elbow Cay and comes by boat every day. Rain, shine, windy or calm. Imagine that! To top that, she is alway cheerful, enthusiastic, and ready to help her students learn.

Miss Dee and student son the way home from school.

Miss Dee and students on the way home from school.

Miss Dee teaches 1st and 2nd graders in her classroom.

Miss Dee teaches 1st and 2nd graders in her classroom.

dsf

First graders – Valentines’ Day !

Lunch is in the open breezeway between two of the classrooms.

Lunch is in the open breezeway between two of the classrooms.

Marcia and I spent a few days working in the school media center/library. A new room had recently been built with a donation from a second home owner. The library held many books, mostly donations from people over the years, but they needed to be organized. We recruited our dear husbands to install two new whiteboards in the media center.

Al and Dan installing the whiteboard in the media center.

Al and Dan installing the whiteboard in the media center.

At the beginning of the second semester (January), we helped with benchmark testing, beginning with one-on-one reading tests for the 1st and 2nd graders. Next, we monitored math assessments administered on the computers.

Students at the computers for math assessments.

Students at the computers for math assessments.

I made number bracelets and introduced them to students during their math centers.

Making number bracelets form pony beads and fuzzy sticks ("pipe cleaners,"  for those of you in m y generation.)

Making number bracelets from pony beads and fuzzy sticks (“pipe cleaners,” for those of you in my generation.)

On Saturdays, we have watched the children learn to sail through the Hope Town Sailing Club’s Junior Sailing program. The morning class is for basics -earning to rig the Opti,  basic steering and boat handling, and  capsize drill. The afternoon class combines Sunfish sailing and Opti racing skills. We have enjoyed watching the children from the docks and from our boat in the harbor as they cruise past us.

Getting ready for sailing lessons

Getting ready for sailing lessons – learning to rig the boat.

Out they go - where's the sail?

Out they go – where’s the sail?

It is fun to watch the children as they learn to handle the boats, but sometimes it is a little unnerving as they lose control right near your big boat!

Sailing around the harbor

Sailing around the harbor in Optis. These three sailors knew what they were doing.

It is fun to watch the children's they learn to handle the boats, but sometimes it is a little unnerving as they lose control right near your big boat!

One of the nicest parts of our stay in Hope Town has been the children, both in school and out of school. They are a vibrant part of this community.

 

 

Island Routines, Living on a Boat

This is a post about the ordinary side of life on an island/living on a boat.  It’s not all beaches, warm blue water and parties. Some folks think we are on an extended vacation. This has been so much more than a vacation. We aren’t just passing through, doing all touristy things and then moving on or returning to our normal life in a week or two. True, 1) we are not working, 2) we are relaxing, 3) we are in a warm climate, 4) we are seeing and experiencing the sights; BUT this does not feel like a typical vacation.  We are living on our boat, day after day, week after week, and month after month. We do the normal daily chores that must be done at home, such as repairs, cooking and cleaning, laundry, shopping for groceries, taking care of financial business, and so on. Besides the snorkeling, lobstering, conching, collecting sea glass, happy hours on boats, concerts, art shows, what do we do????

Our mornings always begin with coffee. It takes some time to boil the water and use the drip pot  (yeah, sometimes I do miss my Keurig coffee maker…..)  Breakfast varies from cereal and yogurt to eggs, french toast or pancakes. Depends on the weather and my mood.  We eat breakfast in our cockpit, watching the sounds and sights of people and boats in the harbor.  Those of who spend the winter here on our boats are known as harbor rats. There is even an unofficial, but recognized, group of veteran Hope Town cruisers who call themselves the “harbor rats, ” complete with t-shirts.

Coffee and coconut bread French toast with mango and strawberry topping. Now that was a special treat!

Coffee and coconut bread French toast with mango and strawberry topping. Now that was a special treat!

Each morning at 8:15 am the “Abaco Cruisers Net” is broadcast on VHF radio Channel 68. This net was started about 20 years ago by Bob and Patty Toler and is completely staffed by cruisers who volunteer to “anchor.”   The purpose of the “net” is for communication and “to promote safety, friendship, and message handling.” We hear about the weather, passage and sea conditions (always critical when you live on a boat), community events, invitations to events at island restaurants and island services. The net ends each morning with an “open mike” time for announcing new arrivals and departures.  It’s almost like having our own local morning tv, without the visual, of course. Will, on Antares, is one of the anchors. He has a perfect radio voice, so easy to listen to while you drink your coffee.

Will is ready to broadcast while Lucy, the talking dog (and yes, she really sounds like she is talking to you) relaxes in the cockpit.

Will is ready to broadcast while Lucy, the talking dog (and yes, she really sounds like she is talking to you) relaxes in the cockpit.

Will and his wife, Muffin, invited me to be a guest “weather person” a few times.  It was great fun!

I'm a "weather girl" now!  Broadcasting from Kindred Spirit.

I’m a “weather girl” now! Broadcasting from Kindred Spirit.

Audio files of the Cruisers Net are available on the Barometer Bob website for a few days after each broadcast. Here is an audio file of my debut as a “weather girl,” if you are so inclined to listen and still housebound due to the ice and snow up north.(Go ahead, Mom and Dad, you are probably the only people who will!)

The main VHF radio attached to the navigation station (with an outside cockpit mic) and the handheld VHF radio.

The main VHF radio attached to the navigation station (with an outside cockpit mic) and the handheld VHF radio.

Most communication among boat people and cottage folks (eg. dirt dwellers) is done with the VHF (or by shouting.) Our call signs are either our boat’s name or the cottage name. 16 is the main hailing channel – “Cutting Class, Cutting Class… Kindred Spirit.” Once the party you are calling acknowledges that they have heard you, you switch to a different channel by saying “up one” or  “down one,” or “six eight” (meaning “68”). It all reminds me of the party phone line we had when I was a little girl. (You young folks have no idea what that was like!) When someone switches channels, the rest of us do too just for amusement, curiosity, or plain nosiness.

~Out Island Internet ~ The BaTelCo cell phone tower.

~ Out Island Internet
~ The BaTelCo cell phone tower. We never did get a Bahamian cell phone and have survived without one.

The VHF is critical for cruisers, but what about internet access? We signed up for a 3-months of OII – “Out Island Internet,” As they say on their website, “For the cruising yachtsman, we have our OII Internet Roaming Packages available at most of Abaco’s anchorages and marinas. They can roam from one picturesque isle to another in the Abaco Chain and stay connected with the same account and never leave their vessel. We are constantly adding new WiFi Hotspots!” Unquote. 
The internet here leaves a bit to be desired, but you soon become grateful just for a connection, regardless of the speed, or lack of speed. It is amazing how much we all need that lifeline, especially now, to stay in touch with our friends and family, as well as for information, news, managing finances, and many other aspects of 21st century living.

Transportation is another aspect of cruising and island life that differs from our land life back home. The importance of dinghies cannot be underestimated. If the “big” boat is our home, our dinghies are our cars. The dinghy takes us everywhere –  to snorkeling, to the beach, to visit other boats, to visit homes on other islands, grocery shopping, laundry duties, and to town.

DINGHIES!

DINGHIES!

For transportation needsThe Albury Ferry service is the water taxi between between the islands, from here to Marsh Harbor and then another one that loops between Hope Town, Man-O-War and Great Guana Cay. We have never used the ferry service ($17 each one-way) but we see them and dodge them as they come in and out of the harbor. The “Donnie” boats, as they are called, are numbered with Roman numerals.

This is Donnie "10", not Donnie "x-rated"

This is Donnie “10”, not Donnie “x-rated”

Bikes are another way to get around the island on land. We borrowed another cruisers’  folding bikes and rode  all the way to the southern end of Elbow Cay.

Al is getting the bikes ready for our ride.

Al is getting the bikes ready for our ride.

Here in Hope Town, the trash is collected on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, which is really nice. Trash and garbage can be a problem when you live on a boat. Many other islands make you pay to bring your trash to shore or don’t provide anything at all. You learn to condense your trash into as small a volume as possible, crushing cans, and cutting up plastic into small pieces. Here in the harbor, people take turns collecting bags of trash from other boats and bringing it in to the trash truck.

~Boaters take turns collecting trash. ~ the trash truck at the dock

~Boaters take turns collecting trash.
~ The trash truck at the dock (view from below in the dinghy.)

Laundry is another chore, just like at home. It has to be done, but we sure don’t do it as often as we do at home in Connecticut. There is no washer and dryer on board this little ship so dirty clothes, sheets and towels must be bundled up and carried (by dinghy, of course) to the marina’s laundry.  It is not cheap – $5 to wash and $5 to dry a load. In any harbor, you will see laundry hanging over the life lines, the boom, or in the flybridge to dry.

Some times must be washed by hand, and some times the dryer doesn't work well and you end up hanging the sheets in the cockpit to finish drying.

Sometimes I need to do a quick wash by hand, and sometimes the dryer doesn’t work well and you end up hanging the sheets in the cockpit to finish drying.

When the washer and dryer are working, I can relax by this beautiful pool. Not too shabby - nice way to get the chores done!

When the washer and dryer are working, I can relax by this beautiful pool. Not too shabby – nice way to get the chores done!

Grocery shopping is often a challenge. When it comes to fresh produce, you quickly adjust to two things – 1) you eat and cook whatever is available, and 2) if you really want it or need it, you don’t look at the price. Harborview, a local Hope Town grocery store, has undergone a minor transformation during our stay. With new refrigeration and freezer units, it now seems to have a better variety and more fresh produce.

~The grocery store ~ Mercedes at the register

~The grocery store
~ Mercedes at the register

Deliveries come on the barge, with an engine that can be heard rumbling through the harbor no matter where you are. It is strange looking and strange sounding.

The barge

The barge – quite a sight and it makes a lot of noise.

For big provisioning, it has been worth a trip to Maxwells in Marsh Harbor. We take the big boat (not the dinghy) and stay overnight. Maxwells is a good walk from the dock but, wow, you can almost find everything you need. Almost.  We provisioned there twice during our time in the Abacos.

This grocery store was truly a sight to behold. Look at the produce!

This grocery store was truly a sight to behold. Look at the produce! Just have to be careful that you don’t purchase more than you can carry back. Or take a taxi! We did that once.

On Friday’s the fishing boat, Down Deep, comes to the dock with fresh fish, lobsters, and conch salad. We bought delicious grouper for dinner.

It's Friday and the Dive Down fishing boat has arrived.

It’s Friday and the Dive Down fishing boat has arrived.

Government or municipal services are a little different down here in the islands. The First Caribbean International Bank is only open on Tuesdays from 10:00 am until 2:00 pm so you have to plan ahead if you need to do any banking around here. I hear that it is quite an event “when the bank comes.” The “bank” arrives with an armed police guard. (I find this a little bit amusing because Hope Town has been one of the safest places I have ever been.) Although we  never needed to use the bank,  I do wish we had stopped by on a Tuesday jus to see this.

~ Bahamian cash ~First International Caribbean Bank

~ Bahamian cash
~First International Caribbean Bank

 The Library in Hope Town is a treasure for its casual and relaxed feeling. It is manned by volunteers and filled with donated books. You don’t need a library card – you just write your name on a sheet in the 3-ring binder and record the books you borrow, crossing them out when you return them. I borrowed a novel to read (no library card necessary), but have been unable to return it. For weeks, whenever I had the book with me, the library was closed. I have a back-up plan, just in case.

The Hope Town Library

The Hope Town Library

There is a post office housed on the second floor of the government building with other services, the Police Station and the Commissioners Office. The Post Office is open from 9:30 am until 4:00 pm and seemed to be the only “active” place in the building. I mailed two post cards for 50 cents each. Don’t expect to receive one from me. I hear it takes a very long time. One was sent to a friend’s nephew for a school project and the other one I mailed to our home in Connecticut just to see how long it will really take. I’m curious.

From left to right - the Post Office, The Commissioners' Office, and the Police

From left to right – the Post Office, The Commissioners’ Office, and the Police

Boats have many systems, just like a house or car, and maintenance takes a lot of Al’s time. I suspect he actually enjoys most of it. I stay out of the engine room and I don’t mess with the mechanics of any other system onboard. But when it comes to cleaning, I do help.

~ Cleaning the stainless  ~ Engine maintenance

~ Cleaning the stainless
~ Engine maintenance

I suppose you could say that we  have “pink” and “blue” jobs, as boringly traditional as that may sound. My real contribution to this ship is in the galley. I don’t allow anyone else in it (galleys are one-person spaces) and I have my own systems for organizing the storage and the refrigeration. Cooking on the boat has been fun, from breakfast to appetizers to dinners. I don’t always remember to take a picture, but you can certainly see that we are not starving down here!

The lower left photo is when I tried to make yogurt from scratch. It worked, but now that I can usually find plain yogurt in the store I don't bother.

The lower left photo is when I tried to make yogurt from scratch. It worked, but now that I can usually find plain yogurt in the store I don’t bother.

We actually get a lot of exercise to offset all that food we eat (and beer and wine we drink….). Living on a boat means you are up and down the ladders and hatchways all day long. We swim, snorkel, or walk almost every day, too. There is also a yoga group on Mondays, Wednesday, and Fridays; but I have to admit I have not been there in a while.

~ Picking up Marcia in the dinghy to go to yoga. ~ Isn't this deck the most beautiful spot for yoga?

~ Picking up Marcia in the dinghy to go to yoga.
~ Isn’t this deck the most beautiful spot for yoga?

It is now 10:05 pm which is waaaaaaay past a cruiser’s normal bedtime (closer to 8:30 or 9:00 pm). Time to say goodnight!   Zzzzzzzzzz

Lubbers, Lunch, Looms, & Lobster

This post combines two visits to Lubbers Quarters with today’s snorkeling trip, allowing me to use four Ls together in the title. It’s a stretch for a title, but hey, this is my blog and I can do what I want.

We have had the good fortune to meet wonderful people here during our stay in the Abacos. Although most of our time has been spent on Elbow Cay (over 80%), we have visited several other cays nearby. Life is full of coincidences and connections that bring people together – Last spring, Al had been corresponding via email with Bruce, who had just bought a Grand Banks 36 on Long Island, NY. Bruce took the boat from there to his home in North Carolina down the ICW. Just before we left on this trip, Bruce told Al to be sure and contact him when we arrive in the Abacos – he spends his winters here on Lubbers Quarters, an island 3 miles south of Hope Town, between Elbow Cay and Marsh Harbor, 1 mile long and 1/2 mile wide.

During our stay here we have visited Bruce and Tracy on Lubbers twice and they have visited us in Hope Town. We have enjoyed each other’s company very much and will certainly stay in touch. When we visit them on Lubbers, we pick a relatively calm day because of the dinghy ride in the Sea of Abaco, about 25-30 minutes. We stop on the eastern shore at the community dock and Bruce picks us up in the golf cart for the ride to his home on the eastern shore.

Passing Tahiti Beach, one of our favorite spots on Elbow Cay

Passing Tahiti Beach, one of our favorite spots on Elbow Cay

We dinghied past two well-known bars and grills - Cracker Ps and Lubbers Landing

We dinghied past two well-known bars and grills – Cracker Ps and Lubbers Landing

Bruce and Tracy's dock - look at that water and view!

Bruce and Tracy’s dock – look at that water and view!

Bruce and Tracy's home on Lubbers Quarters -"Will's Place II"

Bruce and Tracy’s home on Lubbers Quarters -“Will’s Place II,” built by Bruce himself.  It has a beautiful view and is absolutely adorable and comfortable.

On our first trip to Lubbers, jJust as we hopped in our dinghy to return home, our boating friends John and Carol (Palm Pilot) and Dan and Marcia (Cutting Class)  were passing Lubbers Quarters on Palm Pilot after a day of lobster hunting.
We became hitchhikers by water–

Palm Pilot, a catamaran, towing three dinghies!

Palm Pilot, a catamaran, towing three dinghies.

John's unique steering style

John’s unique steering style

Hanging out on the deck of the cat

Hanging out on the deck of the cat – John, Al, Dan, Carol

The sun is sinking low in the sky by the time our day ends.

The sun is sinking low in the sky by the time our day ends.

Bruce and Tracy visited us in Hope Town. Their transportation is their runabout. They use it  to go to Marsh Harbor for groceries and traveling among the other cays. They were kind enough to pick up a few groceries for us before our lunch on Kindred Spirit.

Tracy and Bruce arrive by boat for lunch on Kindred Spirit

Tracy and Bruce arrive by boat for lunch on Kindred Spirit

Yesterday we dinghied back to Lubbers for a lunch of conch fritters. Bruce heard that I don’t care to eat conch, but have a minor obsession with collecting shells while here. He promised to make us conch fritters that would be better than any restaurant’s! To top that, he stopped at a friend’s house who had recently gone conching to let me pick up some more shells.

More conchs!! Al finally put a halt to my collection and only allowed me to pick 4 more. I think there might be 23 onboard now…...

More conchs!! Al finally put a halt to my collection and only allowed me to pick 4 more. I think there might be 23 onboard now……

What a great lunch we had – caesar salad, conch fritters, and homemade ice cream!!

~Bruce stirring the conch fritters ~ frying the fritters ~ finished conch fritters Tracy tossing the salad

~Upper left – Bruce mixing the conch fritters -with lots of conch and peppers (not at all the dough balls you get in restaurants)
~ Upper right – frying the fritters
~ Lower right – finished conch fritters
~Lower left – Tracy tossing the salad

Tracy is an accomplished weaver. Her enthusiam and passion for the craft left me very interested in it.

Tracy is an accomplished weaver. Her enthusiam and passion for the craft has left me curious and interested.

Today was another beautiful day so we dinghied out to Johnny’s Cay for one last snorkel around our favorite head. That one head has the best variety and more fish than anywhere else. It’s like a fish conference or convention. We just snorkel around and around, over and over, watching and looking. I wish we had an underwater video camera to save ti forever, but that would probably interfere with the enjoyment of the moment.

I lost sight of Al and almost panicked, concerned that something had happened to him. Something had – the hunting instinct distracted him from the coral head and he was off scouting under ledges for antenna. Yes, lobsters again. He found one and the next thing I knew he was in the water with his spear. I watched him hunt and spear this lobster from a “front row seat” while snorkeling. Very cool. He had to tease it out from deep under the ledge, spear it, but then lost it as the lobster backed into his hidey hole. (Unlike the lobster, Al does have to come up for air.) Al went back down again as the lobster ran out along the ocean floor, with Al closely chasing him. Speared and caught! Done.

Is that a happy man or what?

Is that a happy man or what?

This was the first time I ever cooked the lobster myself (Marcis always did the steaming and Al did the grilling.)

This was the first time I ever cooked the lobster myself (Marcia always did the steaming for us.)

Enough for some nice lobster quesadillas!  Yummy.