The Christening of Kindred Spirit

Boat names have always fascinated me. Over the past twenty years on the water, we often contemplate the names we see on other boats – Isn’t that an interesting name? Why did they choose that name? What significance does it have for them?   Oh no, why would anyone name a boat THAT? And so on. A boat’s name is a reflection of its owners. Boats are much more personal than cars, and sometimes, even houses. We don’t usually name our houses, do we? Unless we are wealthy and it is an estate or an adorable summer cottage on Nantucket……..

Blue Water Sailing and Latitude 38 have guidelines that are worthy of consideration, and it would seem, often ignored.

1) The Explanation Test. How often do you want to explain what the name means? Bizarre Greek gods, in-jokes, and foreign words usually fail this test. Names that are difficult to spell fall in this category.

2) The Non-Cute Test. How sappy is the name? Puns, childhood nicknames, and in-jokes usually fail this test.

3) The Brevity Test. Imagine repeating your boat name 3 times, followed by a “Mayday”. Does it still sound like a good name?

4) The Hubris Test. If you’re racing, try not to pick names like “Magic Bullet”, “Blew By You” unless you feel you can live up to them.

5) The “Been There, Done That” Test. There are a lot of Island Time, Aquaholic, Serenity, Obsession, Second Wind, Andiamo, Carpe Diem. Unless, of course, that’s what the boat tells you her name is. Or if it truly has a special meaning for you.

6) The Embarrassment Factor. Imagine explaining your boat’s name, especially to people who don’t know you – Breaking Wind, She Got the House.

7) The Omen Test. Your boat may live up to the name if you try naming it Money Pit, Going Broke, B.O.A.T (Break Out Another Thousand.)

8) The Radio Test. “Over and Out” would be a bad name. … “This is Summertime calling Over and Out. Do you copy?”

If you have been reading this blog, you already know how we feel about our new boat’s name, Unfunded Requirement.  It fails Tests #1,3, 6, and 7. In our opinion. 😉 But it did remind us of our Morgan’s previous name, L.O.C. which also failed several of those name tests.

One of the first things Al did when we returned to Groton with the Mariner Orient was to get that name off of the transom!!! Not the easiest task – it requires a heat gun, razor blade, rigorous cleaning and waxing. Mostly done on the swim platform, less than two feet wide.

Al works carefully to remove the very long "Unfunded Requirement."

Al works carefully to remove the very long “Unfunded Requirement.”

A boat with no name

A boat with no name

Although I was quite active in our search for a trawler, my heart wasn’t always in it. We both loved our Morgan 43 sailboat; we both loved sailing. The decision to move to a trawler was designed to keep us on the water as long as possible, as we grow older (ouch!) and to make it easier for me with the lymphedema in my right leg. When it came time to put our name on the transom, I impulsively decided that a “christening” would help me turn the corner and accept this new boat with open arms.

We decided we would continue with the name Kindred Spirit. Why that name? Just before we found our Catalina 34, we were watching the PBS mini-series, Anne of Green Gables. Al and I had only been married for a few years, and friends (Steph & Chuck – do you remember?) who were also watching the series, commented that Al and I had found our “kindred spirit” in each other.

Anne of Green Gables and her kindred spirits.

Anne of Green Gables and her kindred spirit. Anne describes that as “an intimate friend, you know–a really
 kindred spirit to whom I can confide my inmost soul.”

And so, our first Kindred Spirit was born. The next owners of our Catalina 34 and our Morgan 43 have kept the name Kindred Spirit. I believe that is a compliment to Al’s wonderful skill as a captain and boat owner – each boat was reborn and given new life through his talented hands.

Renaming a boat is not something to be done lightly. Nautical folklore says that changing the name will anger the sea gods and curse the boat with bad luck. Reality – almost 90% of all named boats have already been re-named and those other 10% of newer boats will be re-named in the future. Are they really all cursed? I think not. Disregarding superstition, we went ahead and changed the name anyway. The name Kindred Spirit has worked well for us before and will continue, I am sure. I am convinced that I heard the boat give an audible sigh of relief as Al finished the job.

That swim platform is not very wide for a task like this. He did not fall off!

That swim platform is not very wide for a task like this. He did not fall off!

Her new name - attaching it, peeling off the cover, and separating the name where the transom door opens.

Her new name – attaching it, peeling off the cover, and separating the name where the transom door opens.

Changing the name is a big decision, so I decided this must be done with reverence, respect, and guidance from various authentic sources – Google to the rescue! I liked this quote (forget where I found it) –“Some say that when a boat is named it has been enlivened, and from that time on the vessel must be treated with the same respect that we would have for a person. “

Most sources (sites such as BlueWater Sailing, John Vigor, Boatsafe.com, boatnames.net) give similar versions of a boat christening ceremony. I decided that a “Watson blend” would suit us best. According to tradition and legend, every vessel is recorded by specific name in the Ledger of the Deep and is known personally to Poseidon, or Neptune, the god of the sea. Therefore, in order to change the name of our boat, we first must purge the former name from the Ledger of the Deep and from Poseidon’s memory. In other words, de-name the boat.

Neptune (the Roman name) or Poseidon (the Greek name) looks quite fearsome. Best not to anger that guy!

Neptune (the Roman name) or Poseidon (the Greek name) looks quite fearsome. Best not to anger that guy!

Disney's version is a much happier looking fellow.

Disney’s version is a much happier looking fellow.

I was a little concerned when I read that all traces of the former name must be removed before bringing anything aboard with the new name — we unknowingly violated that rule!

There are a few ways to re-name a boat:
1) After the de-naming, one scuttles the boat out of sight of land for cleansing, then re-float it, followed by the renaming.
2) Have a virgin urinate on the bow while renaming the boat and asking Poseidon’s blessing.
3) Pour very good red wine (or champagne) on the bow and offer some to the god Poseidon/Neptune.
Easy decision!!   We will use Method #3, minus the red wine. Seriously – pour red wine on a boat?? That happens unintentionally far too often!

Once we decided to go forward with de-naming and re-naming, we also decided to invite a few friends to witness and celebrate the event with us.

A nautical little evite

A nautical little evite

I assembled the necessary items:

Items needed for the christening

Items needed for the christening

  • Champagne/Prosecco and food (rum cake and fruit)
  • An “ingot” (a metal tag with the old name written on it in an ink that will wash away in the sea)
  • Our “Black Box” (For anyone who owns a boat, we strongly suggest that you read John Vigor’s Black Box Theory. His box was figurative but we made a literal one in 2001 to symbolize our belief in the black box theory. Every one of our Kindred Spirits has carried this box onboard.)
  • Conch horns

On Sunday, August 24, 2014 at 11:00 am Unfunded Requirement ceremoniously and officially became our Kindred Spirit. We picked up guests at the wash down dock.

At the wash down dock to pick up our quests.

At the wash down dock to pick up our guests.

Ledge Light and a beautiful schooner - what a setting for a boat christening!

Ledge Light and a beautiful schooner – what a setting for a boat christening!

Guess who brought the boat out to the mooring for our celebration?? Yes siree- me! With my girlfriends for moral support.

Guess who brought the boat out to the mooring for our celebration?? Me! With my girlfriends Marcia and MJ for moral support.

Everyone is gathered on the bow.

Everyone is gathered on the bow.

In case anyone would like to use the Watson ceremony, here it is in its entirety:

The De-Naming

In the name of all who have sailed aboard this ship in the past, and in the name of all who may sail aboard her in the future, we invoke the ancient gods of the sea and the wind to favor us with their blessing today.

Mighty Neptune, also hailed as Poseidon king of all that moves in or on the waves; and mighty Aeolus, guardian of the winds and all that blows before them:

We offer you our thanks for the protection you have afforded this vessel in the past.

We voice our gratitude that she has always found shelter from tempest and storm and enjoyed safe passage to port.

Now, wherefore, we submit this supplication, that the name whereby this vessel has hitherto been known, Unfunded Requirement, be struck and removed from your records in the Ledger of the Deep. As proof thereof, we submit this ingot bearing her name to be corrupted through your powers and forever be purged from the sea.

The metal tag (a piece of a beer can turned inside out) with the name "Unfunded Requirement"  written on it .

The metal tag (a piece of a beer can turned inside out) with the name “Unfunded Requirement” written on it.)

Further, we ask that when she is again presented for blessing with the name Kindred Spirit, she shall be recognized and shall be accorded once again the privileges she previously enjoyed as well as those privileges enjoyed by every Kindred Spirit that has come before her.

The Re-Naming

For thousands of years, we have gone to sea. We have crafted vessels to carry us and we have called them by name. These ships will nurture and care for us through perilous seas, and so we affectionately call them “she.” To them we toast, and ask to celebrate Kindred Spirit.

Bubbly beverages for the witnesses as well as for the boat!

Bubbly beverages for the witnesses as well as for the boat!

All toast and call  out -- "TO THE SAILORS OF OLD…. TO KINDRED SPIRIT!” Blow the conch horns
!

All toast and call  out — “TO THE SAILORS OF OLD…. TO KINDRED SPIRIT!”
Blow the conch horns
!

The moods of the sea are many, from tranquil to violent. We ask that this ship be given the strength to carry on. We promise to care for her in a seamanlike manner and to keep her “Black Box” filled with points.

All toast and call  out -- “TO THE SEA...TO THE SAILORS OF OLD...TO THE SEA!". Blow conch horns!

The points in our Black Box will keep us safe at sea.
All toast and call  out — “TO THE SEA…TO THE SAILORS OF OLD…TO THE SEA!”.
Blow conch horns!

Today we come to name this lady Kindred Spirit, and send her to sea to be cared for, and to care for the Watson family. We ask the sailors of old and our God of heaven, earth and sea to accept Kindred Spirit as her name, to help her through her passages, and allow her to return with her crew safely.

All toast and call  out — -“TO THE SEA…..TO THE SAILORS BEFORE US…TO KINDRED SPIRIT”          Blow conch horns

I name this ship Kindred Spirit and may she bring fair winds and good fortune to all who sail on her.”

The Captain pours champagne over the bow while everyone toasts and salutes the new Kindred Spirit!

The Captain pours champagne over the bow while everyone toasts and salutes the new Kindred Spirit!

Time to celebrate!

The captain starts the festivities by passing rum cake and fruit around.

The captain starts the festivities by passing rum cake and fruit around.

Our new Kindred  Spirit

Our new Kindred Spirit

She really is a handsome and a very comfortable boat. Maybe it is silly, but I now feel like I can accept this transition to a trawler and enjoy it. Our christening (de-naming and re-naming) really helped me.

After the christening ceremony, we went for a day trip over to West Harbor on Fisher’s Island with our land neighbors, Marge and Jim.

Marge and Jim have been so supportive through our trawler search. This was a great way to thank them and finish this wonderful day.

Marge and Jim have been so supportive through our trawler search. After all the virtual tours through the many trawlers we considered (and rejected), they deserved a ride on the final one!

What a great day!
By the way, have you noticed the new header for the blog? Both of our Kindred Spirits are now there – the Morgan on the day we left on our trip to the Bahamas, and the Mariner on the day we brought her home to Connecticut. I think it works well. We send a special thank you to Mary Jo and Dean for both of those photos.

Napatree Revisited

Returning to familiar and well-loved places can be comforting and relaxing. We were ready to take a short trip on our new boat with the goal of relaxing. Our first 7 days aboard Unfunded Requirement were “delivery mode” – every day was a traveling day, anywhere from 5 hours to 11 hours, depending upon the next logical and convenient location. Now it was time to enjoy the boat and get to know her a little better. The only way to “know” a boat is to use it and spend time on it.

We sub-let our dock this summer because we did not have a boat – makes sense, right?  Fortunately, we still have a permanent town mooring in the outer “field” although things have changed there in the past 3 years. It is no longer our private little “harbor.” In addition to the two transient moorings, there are now three other moorings with ours. Not everyone would want a mooring out here. It isn’t always a comfortable location when the winds and waves are from the west; and the ferry wakes always set the boat rocking. Although the neighborhood is getting crowded, it is still a sweet spot with a wonderful view of  Ledge Light and UCONN’s Avery Point campus.

Our view of Ledge Light, the entrance to the Thames River.

Our view of Ledge Light, the entrance to the Thames River.

UCONN's Avery point campus. The little lighthouse on the left and Branford Mansion on the right.

UCONN’s Avery Point campus. The little lighthouse on the left and Branford Mansion on the right.

One of Al’s favorite things is to check the Ledge Light weather station on UCONN’s Department of Marine Sciences’ “My Sound” website.  He can monitor the weather statistics (wind speed & direction, air temperature, humidity, dew point, and barometric pressure.)

MySound weather station website

MySound weather station website

He particularly loves to use the LedgeCAM, a webcam mounted on a UCONN building.  When you have control of the camera, you can turn it and scan the area. Al controls it so that he has a view of our boat. He did it all the time when the sailboat was out there, especially during storms. One time I telephoned my mother and father in Pennsylvania and gave them step-by-step directions on how to use it. While on the phone I was able to wave to them. That was before the days of FaceTime and our iPhones.

LedgeCAM ~a distant view ~ a close-up view of our boat on its mooring

LedgeCAM
~a distant view of our mooring
~ a close-up view of our boat on its mooring

The weather looked good so we decided to head to Napatree Point in Rhode Island, a favorite spot of ours. We often use the words Napatree and Watch Hill interchangeably. Watch Hill is the village in Westerly, Rhode Island. Napatree is a long 1.5 mile sandy crescent that extends out from the business district and harbor of Watch Hill and forms an anchorage area on its north side. Up until the Hurricane of 1938, Napatree was sickle-shaped and included a long northern extension called Sandy Point. The Sandy Point strip is now separated from Napatree. If you are ever interested in reading more about the 1938 hurricane, we recommend reading The Sudden Sea, Great Hurricane of 1938 by R.A. Scotti.

Satellite view of waters around Napatree, Sandy Point, and Watch Hill. ~ The blue arrow points to our general anchor location.

Satellite view of waters around Napatree, Sandy Point, and Watch Hill. You can see the shallows between Napatree and Sandy Points, where they were once joined prior to the 1938 hurricane.
~ The blue arrow points to our general anchor location.

With the sailboat (and again with the trawler) we must take the route that brings us around the northwestern tip of Sandy Point. This marks the beginning of a shallow channel entrance to the Napatree anchorage and Watch Hill’s harbor. It is the only route that deeper draft boats can take to get there. “Deeper” is relative – the channel can be as low as 5 ft at low tide and must be navigated with caution.

Just before turning into the channel, we pass Stonington.

Just before turning into the channel, we pass Stonington.

~Just ahead of us is the western point of Sandy point. A boat must pass between the visible sandy point and the green marker. The water is actually quite deep through this narrow spot.

~Just ahead of us is that northwestern point of Sandy Point. A boat must pass between the visible sandy edge and the green marker (to the left.) The water is actually quite deep through this very narrow spot.

After rounding the point the channel passes the beaches where small boats anchor for a day trip.

After rounding the point the channel passes the beaches where small boats anchor for a day trip.

We anchored off of Napatree and settled in for a beautiful long weekend.

We anchored off of Napatree and settled in for a beautiful long weekend.

Dean and MJ dinghy over for dinner.

Our friends on Jallao, MJ and Dean, arrived to join us for dinner.

Our first dinner guests aboard the Mariner Orient 38!!

Our first dinner guests aboard the Mariner Orient 38!!

Every evening, as the sun set, we sounded the conch horn. I'm still working on my technique. Dean, of course, picked it up immediately. Former band member!

Every evening, as the sun set, we sounded the conch horn. I’m still working on my technique. Dean, of course, picked it up immediately. Former band member!

One of the things we enjoy about Napatree is the front row seats for the Watch Hill sailing races, races for the little ones in dinghies, small sailboats and larger ones.

Watch Hill racing!

Watch Hill racing!

The Race Committee boats head out to mark the courses and monitor the race.

The Race Committee boats head out to mark the courses and monitor the race.

Napatree is a favorite spot for lots of reasons – it is within 2 hours of our homeport and offers beaches, kayaking, exploring, and a town.

Watching the sea gulls' antics on the beach and on the water.

Watching the sea gulls’ antics on the beach and on the water.

We always kayak around this little "houseboat". It's been anchored off of Napatree year after year. It looks like it is getting more use now.

We always kayak around this little “houseboat”. It’s been anchored off of Napatree year after year. It looks like it is getting more use now.

The line of little shops is visible as you approach by dinghy.

The line of little shops is visible as you approach by dinghy. The town has changed a little in the past year. Some shops have disappeared and others will now give it a try in their place.

A favorite Watch Hill sight is Aphrodite, a 74-foot 1937 Long Island commuter yacht built for financier Jock Whitney to take him back and forth from his home in Manhasset to Wall Street. In her prime, celebrities were her guests –  Fred Astaire, Shirley Temple, Lawrence Olivier, Katharine Hepburn and Spencer Tracy . Whitney gave Aphrodite to the Coast Guard the day after Pearl Harbor was attacked. She served as a PT boat test vessel, a torpedo screen for the British liner Queen Mary and an escort for President Roosevelt’s Hudson River trains. The FBI once caught a purported spy on the boat. Her full history is nicely told on the blog, Messing About in Boats.  After passing through many hands and years of neglect, she was restored from 2003-2005 and now summers in Watch Hill.

The iconic Aphrodite

The iconic Aphrodite

Walking about the village of Watch Hill is always a feast for the eyes. The homes are spectacular. We have noticed that there seems to be more “money” around than in days past. The Ocean House and Taylor Swift have had an impact.

This home sits among similar stately mansions overlooking a pond.

This home sits among similar stately mansions overlooking a pond.

On our walk we had a view of Taylor Swift's home (right) perched on a beach cliff. The Watch Hill Coast Guard Station is on the right.

On our walk we had a view of Taylor Swift’s home (right) perched on a beach cliff. The Watch Hill Coast Guard Station is on the left.

This is the sign at the end of Taylor Swift's "driveway." Amusing - it'a a quote from one of her songs.

This is the sign at the end of Taylor Swift’s “driveway.” Amusing – it’a a quote from one of her songs. That and a guard notify regular folks to stay out. We have noticed that there are many more “tweens” roaming around the town than there once was. I guess she is an attraction for some age groups. 😉

Gin & Tonic and a Mojito (a little change form our usual beer and wine!)We prefer a quiet drink at the Olympia Tea Room.

Gin & Tonic and a Mojito (a little change from our usual beer and wine!)

 

Since 1916, the Olympia Tea Room has become a Watch Hill institution.

Since 1916, the Olympia Tea Room has become a Watch Hill institution.

No visit to Watch Hill is complete without a stop at St. Clair Annex for homemade ice cream! Yum!

No visit to Watch Hill is complete without a stop at St. Clair Annex for homemade ice cream! Yum!

While eating our ice cream, we observed this Rolls Royce Excaliber, a classic.

While eating our ice cream, we observed this Rolls Royce Excaliber, a classic.

Our last evening was spent watching the sunset from the bow, followed by a game of cards.

~MJ & Dean with their boat, Jallao, in the background ~ You know who.

~MJ & Dean with their boat, Jallao, in the background
~ You know who.

Now that we have a boat with a shallower draft (4 feet vs 5 feet, and, yes, a foot can make a big difference!) we decided to try “the cut” instead of going back around Sandy Point. “The Cut” is a relatively new passage developing over time as storms and currents change the depth of the bottom, cutting a narrow but slightly deeper path in the shallow waters. We left Napatree close to high tide to ensure that we would have enough water beneath our keel. We still held our breath as we saw 3.9 feet on the depth finder at one moment. Taking this route shortened the trip home by about 30 minutes.

~ These unofficial orange floats mark the edge of the cut. Notice the difference in the color of the water. ~ The last one marks the beginning of "The Cut" and is even labeled by name.

~ These unofficial orange floats mark the edge of the cut. Notice the difference in the color of the water the shallow sandbar is lighter in color on the other side of the mark.
~ The last one marks the beginning of “The Cut” and is even labeled by name.

We enjoyed our first R&R trip in this boat. I really did rest and relax, but Al continued with his own style of R&R –” rip and restore.”  I am saving his adventures for a separate blog post. 🙂

Homeward Bound – Finally Home!

We have been home for a few days, but time has just slipped away as we take care of things at home.

We left Port Washington very early on Saturday, August 2, around 5:30 am because we hoped to make it to Sachem Head in Guilford, CT, just past the Thimble Islands – a trip of 56 nautical miles. The weather prediction was not ideal, but it sounded do-able. We turned on the radar and discovered that it worked very well  – Yeah! The radar plus our AIS allowed us to keep a careful eye out for other ships and for buoys. The engine was still cranky, but Al is able to get her up and running. A new solenoid is on order.

We used the red light in the galley so that coffee could be made. Red light does not affect your night vision as much as regular lighting. ~ Al peaks his head out the door to maneuver us out the harbor. ~ Radar is good to have in the dark and in limited visibility.

~We used the red light in the galley so that coffee could be made. Red light does not affect your night vision as much as regular lighting.
~ Al peaks his head out the door to maneuver us out the harbor.
~ Radar is good to have in the dark and in limited visibility.

Most of the day was into the current. There was no way to avoid it, unless we wanted to wait until much later when the current changed. The winds picked up (15-18, gusts to 20) and the seas were 3-5 feet.  Without autopilot, someone has to have hands on the wheel almost all the time. That gets tiring when it is hour after hour in bouncing waves and wind.

A lobster boat tossing about a bit as they stop to check the traps.

A lobster boat tossing about a bit as they stop to check the traps.

As we traveled, we crossed paths with several sailboats, sailing, and crew in foul weather gear. This was not really a day for pleasure sailing. After passing two boats, we decided it must be a race. A quick look online confirmed that — The 38th annual Around Long Island Regatta. This race is a 190 nautical mile course, open to all sailboats 26 feet and larger, and designed for sailors at all levels,  It began at 6:00 pm on Thursday, July 31 at Rockaway Point, NY and would end on August 3 at the Glen Cove, NY breakwater.

A few of the sailboats in the Around Long Island Regatta. Not the nicest conditions for a race!

A few of the sailboats in the Around Long Island Regatta. Not the nicest conditions for a race!

It was a very long and tedious day, taking turns at the wheel to steer for 9 hours. We picked up an open mooring in Joshua Cove, off Sachem Head, and simply sat down to rest.

Our  AIS track on Vesselfinder for the day. From Port Washington to Sachem Head

Our AIS track on Vesselfinder for the day. From Port Washington to Sachem Head

Interesting sight format eh mooring. Is this someone's  replica of Stonehenge ?

Interesting sight from the mooring. Is this someone’s replica of Stonehenge ?

The sunset in Joshua Cove. We were in bed pretty shortly after that!

The sunset in Joshua Cove. We were in bed soon after that!

The next day, Sunday, August 3rd, was to be our last day of the trip home. As sailors, we know the importance of the current, even when we can’t take advantage of it. We began our final leg at 5:00 am so that we had it with us instead of against us for the remaining five hours. It can make a difference of 2 knots in our speed. That’s true for sailboats and it is the same for a trawler. Although it was still a gray and overcast day, the winds and seas had calmed considerably.

Heading for home - Al places our Shennecossett burgee on the bow.

Heading for home – Al places our Shennecossett burgee on the bow.

We passed  the Saybrook lighthouses and jetties, the entrance to the Connecticut River.

We passed the Saybrook lighthouses and jetties, the entrance to the Connecticut River.

Hurray!! Ledge Light at the end of New London Harbor with a ferry steaming in behind it.

Hurray!! Ledge Light at the end of New London Harbor with a ferry steaming in behind it.

Our friends MJ and Dean were waiting for us on Avery Point. They took fabulous photos of us as we passed. That's MJ and Dean walking in front of Branford Mansion.

Our friends MJ and Dean were waiting for us on Avery Point. They took photos of us as we passed. That’s MJ and Dean walking in front of Branford Mansion.

Here we are!! Passing in front of Ledge Light.

Here we are!! Passing in front of Ledge Light.

Look who is at the helm on the bridge to bring her into the mooring field!

Look who is at the helm on the bridge to bring her into the mooring field!

Heading into our little mooring field. It's good to be home again.

Heading into our little mooring field. It’s good to be home again.

After leaving the dinghy tied to the mooring ball, we went into the marina to take a dock for the night.

After leaving the dinghy tied to the mooring ball, we went into the marina to take a dock for the night. Much easier to unload that way.

Our friends, Dan and Marcia (Cutting Class)  were waiting at the dock to welcome us home. We had the dock right next to them for the night. It was only 9:30 in the morning, but it was great fun to see everyone and visit. And show off the new boat, of course. 🙂

A champagne toast to a successful boat search, a good voyage home, and begin back on the water again! Thanks for the great photos, MJ and Dean!

A champagne toast to a successful boat search, a good voyage home, and begin back on the water again! Thanks for the great photos, MJ and Dean!

Al consulted with Dan about his plans for adding solar panels. Things have changed (improved) a lot since we put them on the sailboat many years ago.

Al consulted with Dan about our plans for adding solar panels. Things have changed (improved) a lot since we put them on the sailboat many years ago.

While my back was turned, the Captain began to tear apart the boat. Gee whiz, Al, we have only been back for 3 hours!!!! He is just so eager to get started on all of his improvement ideas.

Al removes the bench and cushions and uses the deck chairs to test his idea for future seating.

Al removes the bench and cushions and uses the deck chairs to test his idea for future seating.

The next morning we packed up the things that needed to go home with us. It was time to take the boat back out to the mooring. Al informed me that I would be at the helm for this. He has more confidence in me than I have in myself. I did it, and it was fun!. Maybe I am a powerboat babe at heart??? Nahhh, not really.

Total delivery time? 2+7+1 = 10 days. Two days to drive to the Chesapeake Bay and give the boat a “first” cleaning, seven days of traveling with no non-traveling days, and one day back at the yacht club to recuperate, and unload.

Here it is August 6th now, and we are back on the boat again. It is our 20th wedding anniversary – where else would we spend it??

August 6, 1994 and August 6, 2014 20 amazing and wonderful years together!!

August 6, 1994                                                                    August 6, 2014
                             20 amazing and wonderful years together!!  “Kindred Spirits”

Our dear friends Marcia and Dan joined us for dinner at The Dogwatch Cafe in Stonington. It was a perfect way to celebrate our 20 years together.

Anniversary dinner at the Dogwatch Cafe with Dan and Marcia.

Anniversary dinner at the Dogwatch Cafe with Dan and Marcia.

We are now ready to begin the process of transforming Unfunded Requirement into Kindred Spirit.

We say good bye for now. She looks good out there.