Lynyard Cay and Little Harbour

We really wanted to get down to Little Harbour, a place that is actually on Great Abaco but not far from Lynyard. We can hear Wellington and Gordy on the Cruisers’ Net each morning as they describe the happenings and weather conditions there.  Little Harbour’s entrance is only doable at high tide for boats with a 5 foot draft or more. Although it might be possible, the timing of the high tides for each day restrict when you can come and go. Our anchor location off Lynyard Cay was only about two miles away so we dinghied to Little Harbor from there.

Welcome to Little Harbour!

Welcome to Little Harbour!

Little Harbor 2 red dinghy and dock

Little Harbour is a bit more remote and off the beaten track.

Little Harbour has an interesting history. Randolph Johnston, a Smith College professor, with his wife and four children, sailed away from the “megamachine” and  materialism of civilization on their schooner, Langosta, arriving in Little Harbour, on the western shore of Great Abaco Island, in 1952.  This harbor was virtually uninhabited at the time, so the family lived in the caves on the edge of the harbor while building a thatch- roofed home and a foundry for Johnston’s bronze sculpture work. The process, still used today, is “lost wax bronze casting method, a practice that goes back 5,000 years.”

One of the caves align the harbor's edge

One of the caves align the harbor’s edge

A closer look at one of the caves

A closer look at one of the caves – I cannot imagine living in there (in 1952?)

Randolph Johnston”s work is renowned – one of his large works, titled “St. Peter: Fisher of Men,” is exhibited in the Vatican’s museum in Rome. His son, Pete, creates marine-life sculptures in bronze, runs the Gallery and Pete’s Pub. Although quite excellent, Pete’s sculptures are out of our price range.

The Gallery of bronze sculptures  by Pete and his father Randolph Johnston

The Gallery of bronze sculptures by Pete and his father Randolph Johnston

Two examples of Pete's work that were in an outdoor setting..

Two examples of Pete’s work that were in an outdoor setting..

Pete’s Pub is a true beach bar with sand under your feet and t-shirts hanging overhead. We could not afford the bronze sculptures, but we could afford burgers at the Pub. This weekend was the celebration of the 20th anniversary of Pete’s 50th birthday. We waited to visit the pub until the next day to avoid any crowds.

Exterior of Pete's Pub  Ceiling covered in t-shirts. We wish we had known about this! Could have brought a shirt to ad to the ceiling.

Exterior of Pete’s Pub
Ceiling covered in t-shirts. We wish we had known about this! Could have brought a shirt to ad to the ceiling.

~Wellington serves our lunch of hamburgers and fish sandwich. ~Al at the bar

~Wellington serves our lunch of hamburgers and fish sandwich.
~Al at the bar

No longer isolated and remote, Little Harbour has retained much of its charm and colorful flavor.

You can imagine how appealing I found this wall of conch!

You can imagine how appealing I found this wall of conch!

Plastic people made form beach stuff hanging in a tree

Plastic people made from beach stuff hanging in a tree

The guys are hanging out in  swinging chair hammocks under a tiki style roof.

The guys are hanging out in swinging chair hammocks under a tiki style roof.

The girls know how to hang out, too!

The girls know how to relax, too!

Back at anchor, the other boats planned a beach fire for sunset and invited everyone to join. Another crazy coincidence happened on the beach –  a couple on a powercat, Duetto, said they knew of us from their friends back in CT – Mark and Kim, our former neighbors back in Durham. Duetto has been looking for us. Imagine that – we both just happened to be on that beach on that evening!

Enjoying the fire on the beach

Enjoying the fire on the beach

Naturally, there was lobster hunting again. Dan and Al spent some time on loud last morning searching the ledges under the reefs. Al did spear one, but the other would not come out of his hidey hole far enough to be properly speared and captured.

The hunters strategize a plan of attack.

The hunters strategize a plan of attack.

~Al with lobster  ~Lobster under look bucket, staring at Michele

~Al with lobster
~Lobster in dinghy, staring at Michele (ugh)

These are not lobsters!! Al just can't resist goofing around. Cute. :-)

These are not lobsters!! Al just can’t resist goofing around. Cute. 🙂

Lynyard Cay’s eastern shore is on the Atlantic Ocean so we walked the winding path up and over the brush and scrub growth. Once there, you look out over the rough reef formations, partially covered in sand while jutting out to the water.

Along the path was an old structure with this painted design. Although the structure had seen better days, the painting was still fresh looking.

Along the path was an old structure with this painted design. Although the structure had seen better days, the painting was still fresh looking.

The views of the ocean, incoming surf, and rock were quite dramatic.

Lynyard ocean side 11

Lynyard ocean side 2Lynyard reefs on beach 3Lynyard reefs on beach 2

BUT, there is too much plastic garbage!!  It is shameful what we (humans) are doing to our oceans.

At the high tide mark, this isolated beach is covered with plastic debris.

At the high tide mark, this isolated beach is covered with plastic debris.

My son, Adam had posted a link on his Facebook page to a TedTalk video about a 19 year old student, Boyan Slat, who has been working on ocean plastic pollution. Millions of tons of plastic kill ocean life and poison food chains every year, as well as  spoil these amazing beaches. Boyan Slat has proposed a radical clean-up solution, for which he won the Best Technical Design award 2012 at the Delft University of Technical Design.  I really hope his idea becomes a reality -we need to do something. If you are interested in learning more about Boyan’s project, here are two links:

How the Oceans Can Clean Themselves
The Ocean CleanUp

There is plastic debris and then there is sea glass……I have yet to hear of anyone collecting beautiful pieces of “sea plastic.”  But every time I pick up a piece of sea glass, I wonder what it originally was, how old it is, and where it might have originated. With recycling there is less sea glass now than years ago. We hope that our ocean is cleaned of the plastic debris, but on the other hand, we want people to dispose of their glass into the ocean. Contradictory?  We don’t think so. The glass is not harmful, and it is beautiful when it has been tumbled around in the sea and sands.

This beach on the Atlantic Ocean side of Lynyard was a good place to hunt for sea glass. Both mornings we spent at least an hour searching on the sand and discovered pieces caught in the rough of the reef and rock. Much of our finds were very small pieces, called mermaid tears, and mostly greens.  We enjoy the search for all sizes and all colors.

A great place for hunting

A great place for hunting

 

Lynyard Cay and the Search for a Blue Hole

It was time to stretch our legs again (or would that be “wings,” as in sails??) and see another harbor. We had been waiting for a stretch of several days with gentle winds and low seas to make the trip south to Lynyard Cay and Little Harbour.  Saturday, January 25th through Tuesday, January 28th looked good so Cutting Class (Marcia and Dan) and Kindred Spirit dropped the mooring lines.

We left our little yellow "Reserved Kindred Spirit" buoy tied to our mooring and said "see you later" to our lighthouse.

We left our little yellow “Reserved Kindred Spirit” buoy (a salvage item) tied to our mooring and said “see you later” to our lighthouse.

We left Hope Town at 11:30 am, around mid-tide, motoring slowly as we checked the depths. It was to be a beautiful day!! We were able to sail part of the way and once again enjoy the silent movement through the clear blue water.

Sailing along - It was a spectacular day to do this.

Sailing along – It was a spectacular day to do this.

We took the deeper draft route so that we did not have to worry about depths and coral heads, about 18 miles. The route zig-zagged us along the east coast of Great Abaco, between it and Lubbers Quarters, past Tiloo Cay and the Pelican Cays. What a day! The puffy white clouds accented the blues of the water and the sky.

Passing  the Pelican Cays, I think! ;-)

Passing the Pelican Cays, I think! 😉

Another sailboat in the distance

Another sailboat in the distance

A view of the surf breaking on the reefs beyond the Sea of Abaco.

A view of the surf breaking on the reefs beyond the Sea of Abaco.

We could see straight out to the Atlantic Ocean when we passed North Bar Channel

We could see straight out to the Atlantic Ocean when we passed North Bar Channel

We dropped anchors mid-afternoon off the western shore of Lynyard Cay. There is nothing like looking down into this clear water to see the bottom – so beautiful. With this really good weather, there were other boats anchored as well. Some of them were staging to make the passage through North Bar Channel heading south to Eleuthera.

Al on the bow

Al on the bow

At anchor

At anchor

We ate dinner together on Kindred Spirit, and were treated to another sunset followed by a dark sky with stars that shined so much more brightly than back home in New England, or even in our Abaco home of Hope Town. I wish I could have photographed the night sky so I could remember it.

Yes, another sunset picture, but in a new location!

Yes, another sunset picture, but in a new location!

What a dark night - perfect to see the stars

What a dark night – perfect to see the stars (sorry they don’t show in a photograph.)

The next morning, we quickly packed both of our dinghies for a day of adventure led by John and Carol on Palm Pilot. Palm Pilot is a catamaran and was anchored closer to the Bight of Old Robinson (don’t you just love quirky curious names?) where we were headed.  John’s adventure plans for us included snorkeling, lobstering, and a blue hole.

A map for Blue Holes in the Bight of Old Robinson (almost sounds like the old movie "Goonies." Are you old enough to remember?

Dan’s map for Blue Holes in the Bight of Old Robinson

John led the our little 3-dinghy caravan into the regions labeled on the chart as “unsurveyed area”  – yellow color on the nautical Explorer Chartbook with no depths recorded..

John and Carol lead the way

John and Carol lead the way

Dan and Marcia

Dan and Marcia

It was low tide, and that should have been a warning to us, especially since we are all experienced sailors.  The dinghy engines had to be pulled up and the guys ended up pulling the dinghies and their first mates through the shallows.

I didn't get to ride for very long!! Pretty soon I was out there helping to pull that darn dink!

I didn’t get to ride for very long!! Pretty soon I was out there helping to pull that darn dink!

Then shallow water became no water at one point. It took all three skippers to lift and carry each dinghy over the sandy water or watery sand? Take your pick. And these dinghies are heavy!

This is loooooow water. Maybe noooooo water?

This is loooooow water. Maybe noooooo water?

How many skippers does it take to carry a dinghy when the water is 4 inches deep?

How many skippers does it take to carry a dinghy when the water is 4 inches deep?

The depths improved for a short stretch, and then we were once again in the shallows, unable to use the engines.  The first mates assisted this time; Pushing and pulling those dinghies through the mucky, sucky sand in ankle deep water. It was downright creepy as our feet would get sucked into what felt like quicksand.  My Keen sandal was sucked right off of my foot! John stuck his hand (actually his whole arm) in to retrieve it.

Pulling the dinghies

Pulling the dinghies

Pushing the dinghies

Pushing the dinghies

The agony of the pushing, pulling, and dragging  the dinghies was soon forgotten (well, almost forgotten) when we came to the blue hole. We think this is Blue Hole #5 on that little map.

Dean’s Blue Hole
Dean’s Blue Hole is the world’s deepest known blue hole with seawater, plunging 663 feet deep in a bay on Long Island, Bahamas.

A blue hole is an underwater sinkhole or a vertical cave, roughly circular, that can be hundreds of feet deep, sometimes connecting to other blue holes or eventually exiting into the ocean. The name, “blue hole” comes from the dramatic contrast of the dark blue deeper waters and the shallow waters that surround them. Blue holes formed during past ice ages when sea level was lower. The carbon dioxide in the rain caused chemical weathering and eroded the limestone bedrock. Once the area was submerged at the end of the ice age, the erosion ended.

We snorkeled around the perimeter and saw fish and many, many turtles! As we neared the edge of the blue hole, the water was decidedly colder.  I tried to take some photos from the dinghy. They aren’t as good as the professional one of Dean’s Hole, but here they are —

Tried to catch the contrast in color of the blue hole

Tried to catch the contrast of the darker blue color of the blue hole.

The edge of the blue hole

The edge of the blue hole

This photo has a better distinction of the color as well as the edge.

This photo has a better distinction of the color as well as the edge.

After snorkeling around the blue hole

After snorkeling around the blue hole

During our adventure trek around the Bight of Old Robinson (when we weren’t dragging our dinghies) we saw lots of sea life without even snorkeling. The water was so clear we could look right off the dinghy. We saw bonefish and flying fish. And a shark,  which seems a bit strange to me since the water was not deep at all, maybe 3-6 feet where we spotted him. Once again, no photo (I really can’t go about with the thing glued to my face), but I did take a picture of the “dust” he left behind after taking off.

The shark moved swiftly as our dinghy motored by. I was only able to catch his disturbance of the sand.

The shark moved swiftly as our dinghy motored by. This is just his disturbance of the sand.

A web photo of a sea turtle. There is no way I will ever be quick enough to photograph one.

A web photo of a sea turtle. There is no way I will ever be quick enough to photograph one.

The sea turtles were everywhere.  From our dinghy we would see their heads appear and they would scatter as the dinghy approached. Not like  slow land turtles – these guys are fast swimmers!  We easily saw 50 turtles in this one day. from boat and when snorkeling. I don’t know exactly what type of sea turtle, probably either hawksbill or green turtle. A photo just wasn’t possible because they are much too fast.

One of our favorite things is to see the bright yellow and orange starfish. It is a thrill no matter how many times it happens.

The top photo is of a smaller starfish right on the beach near our boat.THe lower one is the larger yellow kind. This photo was taken from our dinghy.

~Top – a smaller starfish with interesting markings, right on the beach near our boat.
~ Bottom – the larger yellow starfish. This photo was taken from our dinghy.

The slimy and creepy side of sea creatures –

~Upper left – Sea hare or sea slug, Aplysia dactylomela, (there is actually a  website forum devoted to sea slugs should you be inclined to investigate further.
~Lower left – Sea cucumbers are animals, not vegetables. Related to starfish and sea urchin, but certainly not as appealing!! The bodies of sea cucumbers are covered with soft, leathery skin instead of hard spines. They simply look disgusting. When we had to walk our dinghies, we looked downward to be sure we didn’t step on one.
~ Right – Jelly fish

We took a little side trip down a mangrove “sluice” where the current gently takes the dinghy through. Here we were able to see the coral up close without even getting in the water.

Heading into the mangrove sluice

Heading into the mangrove sluice

 

Mangrove trees line the edge. Their roots provide support and also breathe air allowing the mangrove to survive and thrive in saltwater tropical climates.

Mangrove trees line the edge. Their roots provide support and also breathe air, allowing the mangrove to survive and thrive in saltwater tropical climates.

The brief journey through the sluice was slow enough and shallow enough (but not too shallow) to take photos of the coral growth over the side of the dinghy.

Growing coral

Another type of coral

Dinghying along the sluice

Dinghying along the sluice

John and Carol shared their favorite little beach with us. We were certainly ready for a rest and lunch (at 3 pm!) on the beach. They  went back to their catamaran and got the gas grill so we could cook hot dogs, kielbasa and a fish that John had caught.

Our little beach cookout

Our little beach cookout

 

A very nice little beach

A very nice little beach

Look at that water and sand

Look at that water and sand

The day came to an end and we returned to our big boats for a welcome night’s sleep. It was a really great day!!!

Pink clouds as the sun set

Pink clouds as the sun set

Elbow Reef Lighthouse – “The Candy Striped Lighthouse”

WARNINGThis is a long blog post! We had an amazing experience. I don’t ever want to forget this.

The Elbow Reef Lighthouse was our first sight of Hope Town on December 12th when we finally ended our first 3 months of traveling down the East Coast and across the Gulf Stream. The only way to enter Hope Town harbor, as a “deep draft” boat, is to aim directly at the lighthouse as though you were going to run right up onto land. Then you must make a sudden left turn and follow the shore, curving right, into the marked harbor channel. It is a bit unnerving the first time, but we have come in and out so often that it is no big deal now.

The lighthouse has greeted us every morning since then and watched over us every night as we gently swing on our mooring in the harbor.  As a part of our daily surroundings, it has fascinated and intrigued me for weeks.

The Hope Town Lighthouse is a part of our daily life now as you can see from the pictures in our blog.

The lighthouse is a part of our daily life now as you can see from the pictures in our blog.

The Elbow Reef Lighthouse is considered to be “iconic” as it is the most recognizable of the eleven Bahamian lighthouses. Its official name is the Elbow Reef Lighthouse, but most people call it the Hope Town Lighthouse. Shipwrecks were very common in the seas around the Abacos because of the shallow waters and reefs. In 1863 England decided to build a lighthouse at Hope Town to warn ships away from the extensive Elbow Reef, where wrecks occurred once each month, on average. At that time, the people of Hope Town were not pleased to receive a lighthouse because salvaging the wrecked ships (called “wracking” ) was a profitable enterprise for them.

The Elbow Reef Lighthouse on the Bahamian $10 bill

The Elbow Reef Lighthouse on the Bahamian $10 bill

The lighthouse through the children's eyes. Elbow Reef Lighthouse Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Elbow-Reef-Lighthouse-Society/621106601283254)

The lighthouse through the children’s eyes. Elbow Reef Lighthouse Society Facebook page

A picture book, titled “The Candy Striped Lighthouse” was just published in December and tells the story of the lighthouse through a poem by Elizabeth Webb with art by Bruce Johnson. It also includes some history of the Bahamas, The Elbow Reef Lighthouse, and Hope Town. The first two verses:

The Candy Striped Lighthouse I stand on a hill
Watching over the world down below.
I gaze out to sea and around Elbow Cay
And the boats as they pass to and fro.

I bid them goodbye and examine the sky
For changes of wind and of tide;
Look smilingly down on the candy bright town
And Hope Town looks upward with pride.

The Candy Striped Lighthouse

The Candy Striped Lighthouse

Last week the Elbow Reef Lighthouse Preservation Society hosted a presentation by Cullen Chambers, Executive Director of the Tybee Island Historical Society, on the “Challenges and Rewards of Restoring Historic Lighthouses.” Cullen Chambers and his team were here to perform the first in-depth survey of the lighthouse in 50 years. Hope Town is trying to preserve this very special lighthouse while maintaining its charm and unique significance for future generations. This is no simple task since there are numerous repairs and maintenance projects that are needed, e.g. repairs to the lantern room door, windows and shutters, the apron, the slate floor in the tower. Not to mention the challenge of securing parts for the older kerosene light equipment.  The Elbow Reef Lighthouse Preservation Society is “committed to  historically correct restoration and maintenance of the old hand-wound and kerosene-burning technology and the unique keeper’s dwellings. The value as symbols of our national maritime heritage and as a tourist attraction cannot be overstated.”

Our evening was educational and enjoyable as we enjoyed the company of Ginny and Mark, new friends on a boat moored near us.

The evening was informative and social as we enjoyed the company of Ginny and Mark, new friends on a boat moored near us.
Since I posted this blog entry last night, we have heard the sad news  that Cullen Chambers passed away unexpectedly earlier this week.

Finally, on January 19, 2014, we had a good day to climb to the top of the lighthouse. It was a sunny, cool, and dry Sunday morning, perfect for this adventure!

Let me take you with us as we visited the lighthouse and climbed to the top. No guards, no fee, almost no rules. Just wander up and take a look!

View of the lighthouse from the dock

View of the lighthouse from the dock

Standing outside the entrance, looking up. Up close you can see that the red and white sections have a wedding cake tiered look to them.

Standing outside the entrance, looking up. Up close you can see that the red and white sections have a wedding cake tiered look to them.

We will be able to stand on the lower balcony where the netting is draped over the rail (for safety?)

We will be able to stand on the lower balcony where the netting is draped over the rail (for safety?)

The sign above the entrance

The sign above the entrance – 101 steps!

I wrote our names in the guest book

I wrote our names in the guest book

Starting the climb up the spiral staircase

Starting the climb up the spiral staircase

This storage cupboard is curved to match the curvature of the tower.

This storage cupboard is curved to match the curvature of the tower.

The next set of stairs, steeper, for the final climb.

The next set of stairs, steeper, for the final climb.

We could just see part of the fresnel lens

We could just see part of the fresnel lens.

This funny little door is the entrance to the outside balcony. Notice the whimsical handle?

This funny little door is the entrance to the outside balcony. Notice the whimsical handle?

And then we were outside with a 360 degree panoramic view!

Sailboats out on the Sea of Abaco

Sailboats out on the Sea of Abaco

A view of the Parrot Cays to the west of Elbow Cay

A view of the Parrot Cays to the west of Elbow Cay

The little island at the entrance to Hope Town Harbor (the one with the sign that says "Slow Down, Mon! You're in Hope Town!"

The little island at the entrance to Hope Town Harbor (the one with the sign that says “Slow Down, Mon! You’re in Hope Town!”

Overlooking the harbor and across to the settlement of Hope Town

Overlooking the harbor and across to the settlement of Hope Town

A closer view of the settlement

A closer view of the settlement

With the zoom lens you can even see the breaking waves on a reef on the eastern shore.

You can even see the breaking waves on a reef outside the eastern shore.

Kindred Spirit is the 2nd boat in the line of moorings (another zoom)

Kindred Spirit is the 2nd boat in the line of moorings. The water was sparkling brightly in the sun.

Al and Dan are inspecting the structure

Al and Dan are inspecting the structure.

There we are!

There we are!

That adventure was on Sunday, but there is more! We had heard it was possible to watch the light keeper on duty in this very special and unique lighthouse, the only remaining hand-wound kerosene burning lighthouse left in the world. What does that mean in this day of automation? It means that nowhere else could we ever have the experience we had on this evening here in Hope Town.

On Monday, late afternoon, just before sunset, we dinghied back to the lighthouse and sat on the step to wait for the light keeper.

The light keeper's cottage

The light keeper’s cottage

Jeffrey Forbes, Jr. is the keeper of the Elbow Reef Lighthouse. He is a second generation light keeper who is carrying on the tradition he learned from his father, Jeffrey Forbes Sr., a Bahamian lightkeeper for 37 years before he retired. Jeffrey, Jr. graciously allowed us to tag along as he worked. He is quiet and reserved, but readily answered our questions. Jeffrey has been keeping the light burning without assistance since September when the other keeper left on sick leave. It was obvious to us that he loves this”job” of caring for the lighthouse.

These are the pressurizing tanks that push the kerosene fuel up to the lantern. Jeffrey fills the tanks and pressurizes them each night.

These are the pressurizing tanks in the service room directly below the lantern room. The kerosene travels up a tube to an atomizer which sprays into a mantle. Jeffrey fills the tanks and pressurizes them each night.

While Jeffrey pressurized the tanks, we stepped outside to view the sunset.

Looking westward at the sunset from Elbow Reef Lighthouse

Looking westward at the sunset from Elbow Reef Lighthouse

One more photo of Kindred Spirit in the harbor- This is a rare view of her for us.

One more photo of Kindred Spirit in the harbor- This is a rare view of her for us.

We never imagined that we would be able to be right there in the lantern room, next to the fresnel lens! We climbed up a small steep ladder and were right beside the fresnel lens. Jeffrey’s next step was to drop the fabric curtain that surrounds the lens. This curtain is in place and covers the lens throughout the day. Without the cover, the lens could act as a giant magnifying glass and start a fire.

Looking up inside the fresnel lens

Looking up inside the fresnel lens

Jeffrey is preparing the mantle

Jeffrey is preparing the mantle

Jeffrey working on the mantle

Jeffrey working on the mantle

The chimney above the flame lets the heat out so that the lens does not overheat.

The chimney above the flame lets the heat out so that the lens does not overheat.

Let there be light!

Let there be light!

The light glows inside the fresnel lens

The light glows inside the fresnel lens

A view of the flame between the lenses

A view of the flame between the prisms

Once lit, the light is focused as it passes through the optics of a “first order, eight thousand pound Fresnel lens”. Fresnel lenses came in different sizes, called “orders”, ranging from (smallest) to the largest, the First Order lens. The lens  floats on a bed of mercury, reducing friction as it turns around all night to shine its light out onto the sea.

Jeffrey’s work was not done. In fact, his work continues throughout the night. Every two hours,  Jeffrey has to wind, to the top of the tower, seven hundred pounds of weights using a hand winch.  The descending weights, through a series of bronze gears, rotate the four-ton apparatus once around every 15 seconds.

Cable apparatus for winding the weights

Cable apparatus for winding the weights

Jeffrey turns the hand crank many times.

Jeffrey turns the hand crank many times to bring the weights up to the top, on the 100 feet of cable. This must be done every 2 hours during the night to keep the light rotating.

The nautical charts describe its sequence as, “GP FL W(5) EV 15 SEC 120 FT 15M.” – a series of five white flashes every fifteen seconds at 120 feet above sea level, visible for 15 nautical miles.

We descended the spiral stars back down, still in awe of what we had just seen.

We descended the spiral stars back down, still in awe of what we had just seen.

As we walked down the path to the dock, we looked back at the light. We see it through new eyes, appreciating the historical significance as well as the commitment of the light keeper and the people of Hope Town who wish to preserve this special place.

The light shines-2

The light

“The smooth sweep of the turning lenses with their five swords of light cutting the darkness over the sea while the light constantly glows between those beams is known as the “soul” of a lighthouse. Once seen and compared to an electric flashing light, it is not soon forgotten and the use of the word “soul” is more easily understood.”  ~ David Gale,
Founder and President of the Bahamas Lighthouse Preservation Society.