Baltimore, Maryland

We departed Chesapeake City on Monday afternoon, saying goodbye to our new friends, Michele (yes, with one L) and Joe on The Simple Life. We shared the dock together and they are going southward as well. Hope to see them again sometime! We caught a good current and were able to travel farther than expected.

Watch out for those crab pots!

Watch out for those crab pots!

Chesapeake Bay – this northern part of the Bay was very quiet.  The most common sight throughout the Chesapeake is …….. yes ! You are right! Crab Pots!! We swerved through and dodged around many crab pots. Good thing we have practice from our New England lobster pots. It became my personal challenge to try and photograph as many as I could (for awhile). A challenge because the boat is moving forward and up and down and the camera zoom needs a little more time and steadiness. Below is my crab pot collage.

Crab pot collage

Crab pot collage

We spent that night in Rock Creek, just off the Patapsco River which leads to Baltimore.  48 miles and 6 hours from the C& D Canal. We were up and ready the next day to make the 11 mile run into Baltimore’s Inner Harbor. Once again we were in a city atmosphere with industry surrounding the water. Although there were tankers, cargo ships and tugs, I will spare you more photos of them! My favorite sight was the special ceremonial buoy that marks the location where Francis Scott Key wrote the words to the Star Spangled Banner during the War of 1812. He witnessed the British bombardment of Fort McHenry where the Key Bridge now stands.

Ceremonial buoy marking the spot where the Star Spangled Banner was written

Ceremonial buoy marking the spot where the Star Spangled Banner was written

The city of Baltimore with its many marinas

The city of Baltimore with its many marinas

As we rounded the bend, look who else is here! Our very own Mystic Whaler from Connecticut.

Our own Mystic Whaler is here in Baltimore

Our own Mystic Whaler is here in Baltimore

We treated ourselves to a fancy dock so that we could do our necessary chores – fill up with diesel, pump out the you-know-what, fill the water tanks, do laundry, and take long, hot, standing showers with someone else’s water!  We met really nice people on the dock and shared stories and plans.

Kindred Spirit at the Inner Harbor marina

Kindred Spirit at the Inner Harbor marina

In all, we only spent about 26 hours in Baltimore. What did we do beside our housekeeping chores? We walked around the Inner Harbor –

The view across the harbor

The view across the harbor

Dragon paddle boats - now that's a different style for traveling around on the water!

Dragon paddle boats – now that’s a different style for traveling around on the water!

Cool fountains and sculptures

Cool fountains and sculptures

We spent some time in the American Visionary Art Museum, the official national museum for self-taught, intuitive artistry. The art has been created by farmers, housewives, mechanics, retired folk, the disabled, the homeless, and a neurosurgeon. The definition of visionary art captured my attention – “everybody dreams, but our dreamers don’t go to school to learn how to express their visions. Visionary artists are self-taught, intuitive people who find their own way into making of art in an intensely personal way. Visionary art dances on the edge.”

I have only photos of the some of the outside art because no photos are permitted inside. If you are ever in Baltimore, you must visit here.

American Visionary Art Museum ~Nancy Josephson's mirror mosaic Gallery-A-Go-Go bus ~The Community Mosaic Wall behind the bus is the work of at-risk youth ~Be Wilson's Meditation Chapel made form driftwood ~Whirligig by Vollis Simpson ~Ted Ludwiczak's Stone Fountain Heads

American Visionary Art Museum
~Nancy Josephson’s mirror mosaic Gallery-A-Go-Go bus
~The Community Mosaic Wall behind the bus is the work of at-risk youth
~Be Wilson’s Meditation Chapel made form driftwood
~Whirligig by Vollis Simpson
~Ted Ludwiczak’s Stone Fountain Heads

Our dinner of steamed crab, shrimp and sausage

Our dinner of steamed crab, shrimp and sausage

Baltimore Harbor at night

Baltimore Harbor at night

It was time to move on again, so Wednesday afternoon we headed back out the Patapsco River, again passing the industrial side of a harbor city. We saw more traffic this trip than on the previous days.

Twin tugs on their way to guide a big ship into the harbor

Twin tugs on their way to guide a big ship into the harbor

Cargo ships coming and going

Cargo ships coming and going

And that's what a cargo ship looks like when it passes very close to our little Kindred Spirit

And that’s what a cargo ship looks like when it passes very close to our little Kindred Spirit

Once out in the Bay, we passed more crab pots, lighthouses and the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.

The Chespeake Bay Bridge looms ahead of us

The Chesapeake Bay Bridge looms ahead of us

 

~Sandy Point Lighthouse ~Thomas Point Lighthouse ~Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse ~Baltimore Light

~Sandy Point Lighthouse
~Thomas Point Lighthouse
~Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse
~Baltimore Light

 

3 thoughts on “Baltimore, Maryland

  1. Enjoyed the photos and comments about good old Baltimore, Carol’s birthplace and where family still lives. I sure do miss those crab feasts!

  2. I LOVE the Inner Harbor and Baltimore. I actually lived in what they called “the Pepto Bismol building” for nine months when I worked for Laventhol and Horwath before it went bankrupt. Most recently my eldest daughter, her boyfriend and I went to a Ravens/Broncos game. The stadium is close to the Inner Harbor. We were outnumbered as Broncos fans, but we won! (I wish the same could be said for the next time we met!) I’m glad it was so hospitable for you.

    Hugs!!

  3. That sounds like a cool museum. I will have to put it on our “places to go” list for when we head east again.

    And I love that night shot. Must be fun to hang on the boat with all the lights and everything going on around you.

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