3 Weeks, 4 Islands, 6 Harbors – West Tisbury Artisan Festival

Although we certainly enjoyed our rainy day walk around Edgartown, we were eager to have some fun in the sun.

Martha’s Vineyard has a very good transit system that runs between all of the towns. For boaters, this makes the island even better. As seniors, we purchased a 3-day pass for $10. Not bad at all.

The VTA bus (Vineyard Transit Authority)

We took the bus out to West Tisbury for the Vineyard Artisan Festival, held every Thursday throughout the summer at the Grange Hall.  The Artisan Festivals are the only weekly juried art show where the people can browse, shop and meet the artists and crafts people. Over 70 artisans show and demonstrate their work in weaving, fine furniture, pottery, stained glass, oil paintings, pastels, mixed media, sculpture, wampum jewelry, quilts, clothing, sea glass windows, handmade books and more.

West Tisbury Town Hall, also the bus stop.

Lines of white tents filled with feasts for the eyes.

A closer look in the tents – the creativity of the many artisans is amazing.

Inside the old grange hall building I found a weaver and author,  Joanna Erickson. She was delightful to chat with.

The day ended with supper at the Seafood Shanty on the upper deck. Al gets his favorite fried clam strips and I enjoyed lobster quesadilla.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

3 Weeks, 4 Islands, 6 Harbors – Walking Around Edgartown

Among the Flowers, our favorite breakfast spot in Edgartown.

 

Our first full day in Edgartown was warm and humid with a threat of showers, so we donned our foul weather gear for our traditional breakfast at Among the Flowers, a little restaurant on Mayhew Lane. Way back in  2004 we watched a Season 3 episode of Rachel Ray’s “$40 a Day”  featuring restaurants on Martha’s Vineyard which included Among the Flowers. Ever since then, we always have breakfast there. It’s must-do on our Edgartown list.

Foul weather gear for our dinghy ride to shore.

Among the Flowers, outside dining with protection under the awning and porch.

A delicious breakfast once again. Can you believe that is a “side” of fruit with the quiche???         The bill is presented in a cute little glass jar.

Al spent a little time playing the ring on the tree game. He was successful!

After such a filling breakfast, a walk around Edgartown was in order. Edgartown is a classic and elegant whaling town from the 18th and 19th centuries, with beautiful homes and well-manicured gardens.

The lawns and gardens definitely meet the criteria for “well-manicured”.

Classic New England coastal homes.

There simply can’t be too many hydrangeas. My most favorite flowering shrub, anywhere.

August is a month when everything is in full bloom. Even on a gray day, there was color.

Lifting our eyes upwards we can find the church steeples. The Federated Church not he left and the Old Whaling Church on the right.

I have special memories of the Edgartown Library on North Water Street.The old brick building was opened in 1904 and served as the library for 112 years until 2016. We were unaware that a new library had been constructed and opened last year. Why do I have a special memory? Back in July 2006, I was offered a new position while I was off sailing for three weeks. I accepted the job over the phone, but needed to officially resign from my current position ASAP (Sidebar: My immediate supervisor knew about the potential change and had encouraged and supported me in the pursuit.) Although that seems like yesterday, wifi in harbors didn’t really exist and we certainly did not have that capability. Off to the public library where I composed and sent my resignation email. There was no other way to do it in writing quickly. At least we had cell phones “back” then.

The old Edgartown Library

Window shopping in downtown Edgartown.

“Pastoral Dreamer” is a 2x life size sculpture by David Phelps now residing (reclining?) at Vineyard Square. In the sculptor’s words, the piece is meant to convey a sense of “perseverance, optimism, and humor being embrace in the face of adversity.”  Guess we are not art connoisseurs. Just looks like a boy relaxing and enjoying some quiet contemplation time.

Bicycles as planters. Recycling the ‘cycles?

As we walked the streets close to the water, we turned an eye to the harbor. Sure enough we quickly spied our own Kindred Spirit in the mooring field. It’s like a built-in radar system.

We ended our morning stroll on the upper deck of Memorial Wharf overlooking the harbor. Even on a gray day, the views are worth it.

A nice view of those beautiful homes from the waterside.

Chappy ferries
Edgartown Lighthouse
The mooring field

Although not the sunniest of days, it also wasn’t a rainy day. For the afternoon we dinghied over to Edgartown Harbor Light. The first lighthouse, a two-story wooden structure that also served as the lightkeeper’s house, was constructed in 1828.This first Edgartown Light was destroyed in the Hurricane of 1938. In 1939, the United States Coast Guard demolished the existing buildings and installed this 1881 vintage cast-iron tower relocated from Ipswich.

Edgartown Harbor Light marks the entrance to Edgartown Harbor and Katama Bay. I love the way the children are running around the base of the lighthouse.

1828 and 1939

We climbed the stairs to the top for a look. It’s only 45 feet tall, but still gives a nice view of the water and land. It is surrounded by a sandy beach with a stone causeway connecting it to the mainland.

The cloudy skies did become very rainy skies that night.

The dinghy filled with water after a night of heavy rain.

But the sun did come out to shine and play with us!

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

3 Weeks, 4 Islands, 6 Harbors – Edgartown

Moving on, we left Lake Tashmoo. If you look closely at the photo below, you can see a boat nearing that red nun. It is a bit disconcerting to see  such a narrow route into a reasonably wide channel opening.

That red nun again — marks the very narrow entrance in and out of Lake Tashmoo.

Making our way from Tashmoo, we passed across the entrance into Vineyard Haven, flanked on each side by two lighthouses, West Chop and East Chop.

West Chop Light, built in 1817, has been moved back from the edge of the 60-foot high bluff in 1848 and then again in 1891.

The East Chop Lighthouse, in Oak Bluffs, was built in 1878, 79 feet above the sea.  Until 1988, when it was painted white, the East Chop Light was fondly called the “Chocolate Lighthouse” for its brown-red color until it was painted white in 1988.

We passed “Skipper”, a  very crowded charter fishing boat. I guess they had to be careful as they cast out their fishing lines. And not to run to one side when someone has a good catch.

Before we left Tashmoo, I called to make a mooring reservation, something we don’t usually do in home waters (We must be getting older?) I used the online service, Dockwa to reserve a mooring. It was easy and worked well.

Edgartown Harbor is a busy place, with an outer harbor and inner harbor that is part of Katama Bay. The blue arrow is the path into the harbor.

The Edgartown Lighthouse (yellow star on the map above) greets us again as we turn into the inner harbor region.

The Edgartown Lighthouse looks especially cheerful on this day with the colorful sails of the sailing school dinghies.

The next step is to dodge, or patiently wait, for the Chappaquiddck ferries to make their crossing.

The two Chappaquidick ferries pass each other as they cross in synchronization.

The Chappy ferries each dock and discharge passengers and one or two vehicles.

The Edgartown Yacht Club.

Very sleek racing boats docked at the yacht club.

After passing EYC, we turned into the mooring field to hunt for our yellow ball assignment. Turned out to be a good location.

Kindred Spirit in the mooring field. Can you pick her out? Hint – the red bottom of the Snark and the edge of my green kayak are both visible on the port side of the flybridge.

It’s been 5 years since we visited Edgartown and we were eager to get reacquainted with this charming and elegant town, starting with the mooring field and boats.

The Edgartown dinghy dock. That hasn’t changed – you still have to jocky around and find a space. As long as everyone ties with a long painter, you can manage when the dinghies are two deep. But, hey, there IS a dinghy dock!

Mike!! He still runs the pump-out boat and he remembered us from the name “Kindred Spirit”. He was interested in our “new” boat and came aboard for a visit and tour.

This little catboat sailed out and back every day. That sail is amazing.

On one of our dinghy rides around the mooring field, we spotted two boats, not near each other. But combined, they brought a big smile to our faces and a chuckle. If you spend time in Hope Town, Abacos, you will know exactly why.

Now this sailboat caught my eye! Al loves to say “correcto mundo”, but I have never seen a boat named that before. Remember the character Fonzie on the sitcom Happy Days?

Getting reacquainted with Edgartown required that we spend some time during our stay evaluating the ice cream shops. We tested Mad Marthas, Scoops, and Scoop Shack.

The winner is ………………………..

Scoop Shack wins!

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave