Beaufort and the SSCA Cruising Station on Ladys Island

Remember when I dropped my camera back in Georgetown, South Carolina?? Sometimes things happen for a reason, you just don’t know the reason until much later, if ever.  I ordered a new camera through Amazon (thank you, Adam for the fast & free shipping!) and had it shipped to Beaufort, South Carolina (Note – This is Beaufort, SOUTH Carolina, not Beaufort NORTH, Carolina. This Beaufort is the one pronounced “Bew-fort” while the North Carolina one is pronounced “Bo-fort.”) Why Beaufort? I looked ahead to where we might be by the time a package could arrive in a location and cross-referenced that with the SSCA “Cruising Stations.” Your next question would be what is an SSCA Cruising Station? Cruising Station hosts are members who volunteer to serve as a contact and host for other members in a given location. They may offer information about a port and facilities, welcome you, provide local maps and guides, accept packages, and assist in locating things you might need. I contacted the Butlers in Beaufort (Ladys Island)  to ask if I could have the new camera sent to them. Not only did Rick say yes, but he also stayed in contact with us, gave wonderful advice on the route we would be taking, and offered his own dock as a place to stay.

If I had not dropped and broken my camera, we would never have contacted Rick and met both him and his lovely wife, Carol. Things do happen for a reason! The morning of our arrival, Rick was out sailing in his beetle cat and quickly hopped on his dock to help us tie up. And what a beautiful dock it is – teal colored! You know how I love my blues.

Kindred Spirit resting at the Butler's dock

Kindred Spirit resting at the Butler’s dock

It is long dock!

It is long dock!

Once we were settled in, we spent the afternoon cleaning Kindred Spirit. She was scrubbed outside and inside, the refrigerator was defrosted, the stainless was polished, and the teak was sealed again. Al found time to make a “wave stopper” to lessen the sound of the waves slapping against the transom.

Al and his "wave stopper"

Al and his “wave stopper”

Rick and Carol invited us for cocktails and conversation, and introduced us to their neighbors, Allan and Cathy, also cruisers and once lived in Farmington, CT. There’s that small world again!

Carol, Rick, Cathy, Allan, and Al

Carol, Rick, Cathy, Allan, and Al

Rick showed us the best, absolutely the best, grandchildren’s room that I have ever seen in my life. I wanted to be a child again just to spend time in it.  Al was totally captured by Rick’s  workmanship and creativity – from a  nautical perspective and carpenter’s  perspective.

A nautical space for the grandchildren  designed and built by Rick

A nautical space for the grandchildren designed and built by Rick

The study area

The study area

Every detail was a delight to behold

Every detail was a nautical delight to behold

Rick and Al discussing the fine points of the room

Rick and Al discussing the fine points of the room

The tides are very different here in the south, with a much greater range.  New London, CT’s tidal range is 3 feet, 1 inch, while Beaufort, South Carolina experiences a 6-8 foot tidal range. We were fascinated with Rick’s “finger” on the dock —

The finger pints to the tide's height

The finger points to the depth of the water below the dock.
~On the left, the water is LOW since the finger is pointing down just below 7 feet.
~ On the right, the water level is HIGH, with the finger pointing at 15 feet.

We spent Monday doing errands and picking up boat and provisioning items, as well as visiting Beaufort. Beaufort is a charming small city. Once again, this is southern town was the location for a few very famous films – Forrest Gump, The Big Chill, Prince of Tides. We enjoyed our afternoon in Beaufort very much.

Historic homes, Spanish moss hanging on the trees

Historic homes, Spanish moss hanging on the trees

Beaufort has an amazing waterfront park

Beaufort has an amazing waterfront park

I loved the oyster shells embedded in the concrete paths

I loved the oyster shells embedded in the concrete paths

Relaxing in the waterfront park

Relaxing in the waterfront park

And, of course, we found an ice cream parlor – Southern Sweets!

Yummy ice cream, really cute place

Yummy ice cream, really cute place

Beaufort has mermaids, too. I wonder if they are cousins of Norfolk's mermaids?

Beaufort has mermaids, too. I wonder if they are cousins of Norfolk’s mermaids?

Tuesday came and it was time to say goodbye to Rick and Carol, as well as Beaufort. We hope to visit again on our way north in the spring.

The view from the Butler's home

The view of the dock from the Butler’s home

A sunrise tellin, given to me by Rick. I will be looking for them in the Bahamas! Thank you, Rick. I will treasure this one.

A sunrise tellin, given to me by Rick. I will be looking for them in the Bahamas! Thank you, Rick. I will treasure this one.

We passed through Ladys Island swing bridge

We passed through Ladys Island swing bridge

Put up our sails after the fixed bridge

Put up our sails and continued on.

 

Charleston Charm

We only spent two days in Charleston, South Carolina, one day beautiful and one day cloudy, but the city shined throughout. Charleston is one of the most beautiful cities I have ever seen (ok, that isn’t a long list, but my own experience is my only reference point.) It is like stepping back in time; the architecture  and history just surrounds you. I really wished I had my camera. 🙁 I have a few pictures taken with my iPhone but it couldn’t capture everything we saw.

As we sailed past the southern tip of Charleston we could see Battery Park

As we sailed past the southern tip of Charleston we could see Battery Park

We started our visit with a carriage tour. It was a neat way to travel around the city and to see it. Charleston has a unique way of managing the carriage tour companies. Each carriage must first stop at a “checkpoint” where a lottery system is used. They really use little balls in a spinning wheel. The specific tour is randomly selected in this lottery. No one, not the city, the carriage company or you the individual tourist, gets to pick which specific tour of the city you will get. This is done to fairly spread the carriages out so they aren’t all in one place or section of the city.

We chose Old South Carriage Tours. ~ Janice our guide was entertaining and knowledgeable. ~ Steve, our horse

We chose Old South Carriage Tours.
~ Janice our guide was entertaining and knowledgeable.
~ Steve, our horse

Charleston has a height restriction on its buildings, to this day. No building in Charleston can be built higher than its church steeples. I don’t know if that is an actual law, but that’s what Janice told us.

The tallest building in South Carolina.

The tallest building in South Carolina.

The streets of Charleston

Stucco was used to cover the brick. The stucco was etched to make it look like stones which were more prestigious. This building's stucco has deteriorated over the years.

Stucco was used to cover the brick. The stucco was etched to make it look like stones which were more prestigious. This building’s stucco has deteriorated over the years.

Here it is fall and the flowers are still blooming - we are in the south!

Here it is fall and the flowers are still blooming – we are in the south!

More flower boxes with a little bit of Halloween thrown in

More flower boxes with a little bit of Halloween thrown in

A home  "south of Broad", known as SOBs.

A home “south of Broad”, known as SOBs. (That was considered to be a prestigious designation.)

Just a lovely front

Just a lovely front to this home

The ironwork is one of Charleston’s most unique features. When a house was damaged or destroyed its ironwork would often show up on another house over the years.

Ironwork gates, balconies, fences, windows

Ironwork gates, balconies, fences, windows

Gorgeous side portico and ironwork gate

Gorgeous side portico and ironwork gate

On August 31, 1886, Charleston was struck by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded on the East Coast, damaging or destroying hundreds of buildings in and around the city.  Buildings that were rebuilt were repaired or reinforced with “earthquake bolts.”  Long iron rods were run through walls and anchored with a plate and a large iron nut. These earthquake bolts can still be seen on the sides of most Charleston buildings. No one really knows if the bolts are truly effective. Some skeptics think it may just have been an enterprising scheme by an”earthquake bolt salesman.”

Earthquake bolts are visible on the side of this brick building.

Earthquake bolts are visible on the side of this brick building.

Earthquake bolts adorn the front of this lovely structure.

Earthquake bolts adorn the front of this lovely structure.

This doorway was an interesting architectural feature.

The older entrance structure is still visible.

The older entrance structure is still visible.

A close-up of the writing above the door, gives recognition to the the “union” for restoration after the earthquake. “Union” = “Yankees”?
doorway - earthquake close upOur carriage tour was on Halloween. This one home decorates for Halloween and Christmas. The very top pointed structure is actually draped with black fabric to imitate a witch’s hat. At Christmas, it becomes a red Santa hat!

Halloween in Charleston

Halloween in Charleston

Centre Market or City Market, is a historic market complex in downtown, dating from the  1790s. It stretches for four city blocks through a  series of one-story market sheds. Along Meeting Street, there are even more sweetgrass baskets displayed and being made.

Sweetgrass baskets

Sweetgrass baskets

On our second day in Charleston, we toured the Nathaniel Russell House Museum which has been carefully preserved and restored. It is most well-known for its self-supporting elliptical spiral staircase. We also toured the Aiken-Rhett House Museum, which is preserved under a conservation approach rather than a restoration approach. This means everything has been left as it is, even if it is not in the best of condition or dates from different time periods.The two houses were an interesting contrast. We enjoyed both!

After all this touring and history, we needed a little libation and food so we ate lunch at Hymans’ Seafood, evidently very famous given the number of famous people who have eaten there! We had fried green tomatoes (Wadmalaw Delight) with grits, hush puppies, and a sampler of fried oysters, shrimp, crab cakes, and fish with local Palmetto beers.

"Fish" decor at Hyman's Seafood. ~Plates hanging on the wall are signed by the famous people who have eaten here. Gee, no one asked us to do that. :-(

“Fish” decor at Hyman’s Seafood.
~Plates hanging on the wall are signed by the famous people who have eaten here. Gee, no one asked us to do that. 🙁

Palmetto beers at Hymans SeafoodBefore I finish with our time in Charleston, I simply must describe the marina where we spent the two days – Charleston City Marina. Certainly the most “upscale” marina of our experience over the past 7 weeks! We were one of the smallest and oldest boats there; most were large power yachts. The marina provided a free van to take you downtown, free coffee, and a newspaper delivered to your boat in the morning, plus  a happy hour with beer, wine and sandwiches every evening. The outside dock, known as the megadock, is almost a half mile long!  But the talk of the marina this week was Rising Sun, a megayacht docked on the long outside pier. (I might also mention that our little Kindred Spirit was docked on that same long pier.)

~The crew loading Rising Sun  ~ Al next to (or drawfed by) Rising Sun

~The crew loading Rising Sun
~ Al next to (or dwarfed by) Rising Sun

A few tidbits we learned about Rising Sun, the 6th largest megayacht in the world.

  • 454 feet long, with a beam of 61 feet
  • Can travel at 26- 28 knots speed
  • Fuel capacity – we heard different numbers. Supposedly they took on 180,000 gallons (at $4/gallon that would be $720,000), but has a capacity of 265,000 gallons.
  • Custom built in 2004 for Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle Corporation
  • Currently owned by David Geffen, record executive, film producer, theatrical producer and philanthropist
  • Reported to have 82 rooms, an extensive wine cellar, a movie theater and basketball court that doubles as a helicopter landing pad.
  • Room for 16 guests and a crew of 45

A crew of 45 for 16 guests………. don’t you think Kindred Spirit is a bit understaffed????? Seriously, we may not be a megayacht, but we are in the same port and having fun!

I want to come back to Charleston someday!

 

Back in the ICW in Low Country

We said goodbye to Georgetown in the early morning fog, which we expected to lift soon.

There was an eerie feeling to the morning as we passed the fishing boats.

There was an eerie feeling to the morning as we passed the fishing boats.

But the fog did not lift quickly so we moved very carefully and very slowly back out into the ICW.

The sun tried to break through but just couldn't do it.

The sun tried to break through but just couldn’t do it.

Fog with a little sun in the ICW

Fog with a little sun in the ICW

We used the chart plotter, the radar, the ICW markers and our eyes and ears as we continued along.

We used the chart plotter, the radar, the ICW markers and our eyes and ears as we continued along.

The morning continued to have that eerie Halloweenie feeling.

The morning continued to have that eerie Halloweenie feeling.

Hurrah! The sun finally won and brightened our day and our spirits. What a relief! We traveled along, sometimes with the current  and sometimes against it. It all depended upon whether there was an inlet opening near the ICW. It was very hard to predict just what it would be, quite unlike our New England waters. We did pretty well and had a nice assist from the current for most of the day.

A beautiful day in the ICW in the Low Country

A beautiful day in the ICW in the Low Country

A beautiful white bird stands out against the marsh grasses

A white bird stands out against the marsh grasses

There had been warnings about unusually severe shoaling in certain sections of the ICW so we kept a watchful eye on the depth at all times. There are major tides here in South Carolina. Most of the homes along this stretch had their own docks, but they sat in mud at low tide.

Can you see how the dock sits in the mud at low tide?

Can you see how this dock is sitting in the mud at low tide?

This is an ICW marker that

This is an ICW marker that supposedly marks the edge of the safe depths. Don’t think so! It is sitting in mud – don’t go near there.

How I wished I had my camera! The iPhone just can’t do this justice. We passed several structures that could only be the remains of the gates built to regulate the water in the rice fields, letting in water when needed and keeping it out when necessary. Supposedly a slave chid would sit atop the gate and wash his/her hands in the water on the non-field side. As long as the soap lathered, all was well. As soon as the soap no longer lathered, it was a sign that the water was sea water and salty. Any sea water let into the fields would ruin the soil for many years.

The structure that you can barely see is the remnants of a rice field gate.

The structure that you can barely see is the remnants of a rice field gate.

It still amazes us how often we dolphins in the ICW, sometimes far from the ocean, or so it seems to us.

There was a dolphin greeting party as we entered Long Creek to stop for the night. us as we

There was a dolphin greeting party as we entered Long Creek to stop for the night.

Long Creek was a lovely place to settle for the evening. A perfect example of the many winding, squiggly-wiggly creeks throughout South Carolina’s lowcountry.

Evening in the salt marsh

Evening in the salt marshes of Long Creek

Still catching fish as the day comes to an end.

Still catching fish as the day comes to an end.

Off to Charleston tomorrow!

October 31st – Adventure statistics so far
Days since we left home – 50 days
Days traveling – 31 days
Miles traveled – 1,046 nautical miles
Average distance traveled per day – 34 miles
ICW miles covered – 469 statute miles
Distance outside ICW since Mile 0 – 102 offshore nautical miles
Nights at dock – 10 (2 were free docks)
Nights on mooring – 2 (free)
Nights at anchor – 27 (also free!)
Longest passage – 13 hours, 84 miles Sandy Hook, NJ to Atlantic City, NJ

Ice cream parlors – 8 (that’s really not many)
Museums – 7 ( a mix of history, science and art)

  • C&D Canal Museum, Chesapeake City
  • American Visionary Art Museum, Baltimore, MD
  • Town of Oxford Museum – Oxford, MD
  • Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum – St Michaels, MD
  • Virginia Air and Space Museum – Hampton, VA
  • North Caroline Maritime Museum – Beaufort, NC
  • Rice Museum – Georgetown, SC

 

 

Low Country – Georgetown, SC

We are now in “Low Country”, northern Lowcountry to be specific. South Carolina is considered deep South and is very different from North Carolina.

Floating water hyacinths

Floating water hyacinths – do they like the fresh water here, just a little away from the salty ICW?

During our approach to Georgetown on the Winyah River and then the Sampit River, there were floating clusters of this plant. We hadn’t seen that before and were quite curious about what it was, especially after hearing about the duckweed problem in Dismal Swamp. We knew it couldn’t be duckweed, but pondered whether it was kudzu or not. Google to the rescue once again. I think it is  a water hyacinth plant.

We anchored in Georgetown’s tiny waterway. It is very narrow because there are derelict boats abandoned between the docks on one side and the island on the other.  But we found some space and let the Rocna anchor do its thing.   There was enough time to dinghy to shore and walk around Georgetown – scout it out. It was a very quiet Monday, and most things were closed already (It was 5:30 -6:00).

View of Georgetown from our anchor

View of Georgetown from our anchor

Our view of the shrimp boats

Our view of the shrimp boats

Georgetown is South Carolina’s third oldest city (1729) and became a hub for transferring market goods/produce from plantations and supplies back to the plantations, mostly by the waterways of the rivers that meet there – Waccamaw, Black, and Pee Dee Rivers. By the 1840s this area produced half of the rice consumed in the United States. Here’s another film tidbit – The Patriot (with Mel Gibson) was filmed in Georgetown. His character, Benjamin Martin, was a mash- up of several Revolutionary War figures, Francis Marion (“Swamp Fox”), Daniel Morgan, Thomas Sumter, and Andrew Pickens; and of course, the film embellished and exaggerated the Swamp Fox legend.

Georgetown has a small town feeling to it, with tree-lined streets. It was obvious that Georgetown welcomes transient boaters through its services, tours, and information. The most obvious welcome was the nice big sign for their dinghy dock. Some ports try to challenge you to find their dinghy dock if they even have one! The people were so friendly that we spent time just chatting with them at each place we stopped whether it was a bookstore, museum, gallery, bakery  or just a street corner. I really like that South Carolina accent.

Although it says "no overnight docking", the docks clearly for dinghies with lots of space.

Although it says “no overnight docking”, these docks were for dinghies and had plenty of space.

Back on September 25th we had heard through the cruisers’ net that there was a fire on Georgetown docks.  It had destroyed 7 buildings dating back to the mid-1800’s in the shopping and dining district, including a restaurant, bookstore, and florist among others.

Georgetown waterfront fire scene, two months later

Georgetown waterfront fire scene, two months later

Georgetown fire scene

Georgetown fire scene

The town is already planning to rebuild and restore the historic buildings. The old bricks with all of their charm are being stacked on pallets to be reused.

Georgetown is a great little city for walking around.

Georgetown is a great little city for walking around.

The county and city landmark is the Clock Tower (1842), visible from anywhere in the city. There is a clock face on all four sides.

Georgetown Clock Tower

Georgetown Clock Tower

A view from below

A view from below

We took a guided tour of the Rice Museum (in the same building as the Clock Tower), and learned quite a bit about the rice plantations-  very labor intensive, but evidently quite profitable in their time, hence the name “Carolina gold.”

The Rice Museum door. At one time this building also served as a jail.

The Rice Museum door. At one time this building also served as a jail.

Herb garden along the side of the Rice Museum. I bought parsley plants in the Museum's gift shop.

Herb garden along the side of the Rice Museum. I bought parsley plants in the Museum’s gift shop.

The shelves of old plantation and market ledgers

The shelves of old plantation and market ledgers

I was quite surprised that they allowed us to handle the old ledgers from the plantations and market.  It’s actually a thrill to be able to touch something old and not view it behind glass.

A ledger from 1896

A ledger from 1896

The third floor of the museum houses the skeleton of America’s oldest known vessel, the Brown’s ferry vessel, a 50-foot, 18th century all-purpose freighter. It was a sailing vessel but could also be rowed or pushed when necessary. They removed the roof of the museum to get the skeleton inside. that’s commitment.

"Skeleton" of the Browns Ferry Vessel

“Skeleton” of the Browns Ferry Vessel

Reconstructed model of the vessel

Reconstructed model of the vessel

The Rice Museum’s gift shop was more like a gallery with locally made crafts and art, as well as rice and preserves. I carefully considered what might be a memento of this region and chose a small sweetgrass basket and a clothes pin “Gullah angel” doll representing hope. She comes with a poem about the four sisters (Joy, Love, Peace, Hope) in English and in Gullah. I think she will make a lovely tree ornament.

Low Country treasures - Small sweetgrass basket and a Gullah angel doll

Low Country treasures – Small sweetgrass basket and a Gullah angel doll

Georgetown has many restaurants. Unfortunately, the one we really wanted to try was closed when we got there, 🙁 so we tried the River House instead.  Our goal was to have some local foods – my first shrimp and grits! Tasty, but pretty heavy in the tummy.

The River Room along the waterfront boardwalk

The River Room along the waterfront boardwalk

Shrimp and grits in the front and Barbecue in the back

Shrimp and grits in the front and Barbecue in the back

Keeping with food thread here, we were told to try the Kudzu Bakery’s rum cake by our friends, Tom and Joyce (in Oriental). The emphasis is definitely on the rum!

~Kudzu Bakery front door ~ Kudzu Bakery outdoor terrace ~ and the rum cake!

~Kudzu Bakery front door
~ Kudzu Bakery outdoor terrace
~ and the rum cake!

Georgetown is worth a visit. We never even had time to take any of the tours which also sounded interesting. Downside of the day – I dropped my camera. Just a little drop, but evidently enough to kill it without even a blemish on the outside. So now we face the cruiser’s dilemma again – no car to go shopping, no electronic stores in the harbors or anchorages, and no way I can be without a camera, amateur though I am. Don’t expect much of a blog for the next few days—the iPhone camera just isn’t as good as my little Canon was.

Offshore Days off South Carolina

We just covered 102 miles in two days by going offshore.

We left Southport, North Carolina and decided to make our first offshore run since entering the ICW back in Virginia. We ventured back out to the Cape Fear River and through the Cape Fear inlet, heading for Little River Inlet. This would be a short offshore run and easily doable in one day, bringing us across the border into South Carolina!

The sun was rising as we left Southport and headed out the Cape Fear Inlet

The sun was rising as we left Southport and headed out the Cape Fear Inlet

Oak Island Light

Oak Island Light – took three tries to catch it with the light flashing.

Cool morning but nice and sunny

Cool morning but nice and sunny

Once out past the inlet, the waves were rolling, resulting in water over the bow, something we had not seen since Long island Sound on September 12th.  We were really hoping for a sail, but that only lasted for 2 hours. Back to the engine. Ugh.

Some sailing time

Some sailing time

Little River Inlet

Little River Inlet

We anchored in Calabash Creek, off of Little River, by mid-afternoon, giving us some time to relax before dinner.

Michele trying yoga on the front deck. Forgive the form! It isn't easy in that space!

Michele trying yoga on the front deck. Forgive the form! It isn’t easy in that space!

Several boats filed in after us to anchor here for the night. Once again (I think the 4th time) we found ourselves near Simple Life with Joe and Michele, who anchored just ahead of us. It was a quiet evening in the creek.

Four other boats joined us here in Calabash Creek for the night

Six other boats joined us here in Calabash Creek for the night

Little River Casino Boat - a 5-hour tour out to the ocean with "Las Vegas style gambling". It passed right by our little anchorage

Little River Casino Boat – a 5-hour tour out to the ocean with “Las Vegas style gambling”. It passed right by our little anchorage

We reviewed our charts and routes for the next day as well as another careful look at the weather. Both the Captain and the Admiral agreed that tomorrow would be another offshore day to Winyah Inlet, leading ultimately to Georgetown. The ICW has been a fascinating experience, but we enjoyed being “outside” in the ocean. It must be our New England blood – it felt more like home. It also made for a more relaxing trip (if the wind and weather cooperate) because autopilot took over and we did not need to constantly maneuver among the markers, boats, bridges, and shallows of the ICW.

The route from Little River to Winyah Inlet, and ultimately Georgetown, was 67 miles long which would be just about the maximum safely possible during daylight at 6 knots/hour.  We left as early as possible, 7:02 am, and it was just lightening a tiny bit.

Just barely enough light to see as we left Calabash Creek

Just barely enough light to see as we left Calabash Creek

Early dawn is one of the most beautiful times of the day

Early dawn is one of the most beautiful times of the day

Because it was still a bit dark, we carefully followed our breadcrumbs from yesterday’s trip back out of the inlet. As you can see on the chartplotter photo below, this was another case of don’t use only the electronics or charts. They can be outdated and markers are moved for new shallows.

It's a wierd feeling when the chartplotter looks like this but you know you aren't going over land!

It’s a wierd feeling when the chartplotter looks like this but you know you aren’t going over land! Trust the actual markers and your eyes!! You just keep repeating that to ourself as you carefully move along.

If you get tired of looking at photos of the dawn, fast forward through here. It was so beautiful I could not stop taking pictures.

Dawn at Little River Inlet

Dawn at Little River Inlet

Offshore dawn

Dawn

Dawn brightens in the sky over the ocean

Dawn brightens in the sky over the ocean

An offshore sunrise begins

An offshore sunrise begins

Sun rising

Sun rising

What deep colors!

What deep colors!

We were surprised by how utterly flat the seas were. What we call a  “power boater’s dream day.” The water was so flat that the ocean blended with the sky. The day became cloudy; the kind of cloudy that is subdued, but not depressing.

VERY calm and flat seas

VERY calm and flat seas

Where is the horizon?

Where is the horizon?

It was so calm I was able to make us a nice, big, hot breakfast in the galley while underway!

French toast layered with banana and apples, and bacon, of course.

French toast layered with banana and apples, and bacon, of course.

We really do try to sail whenever possible. Really!

We really do try to sail whenever possible. Really!

We spent the entire day alone, ten miles offshore, and never saw another boat until we reached the entrance to Winyah Inlet.

Finally, we have company, in the distance. A shrimper.

Finally, we have company, in the distance. A shrimper.

Entering Winyah Inlet

Entering Winyah Inlet

~A pelican convention on the rocks of the submerged breakwater. ~ Pelican on the move! ~Pelican splashdown!! (That was not easy to photograph)

~A pelican convention on the rocks of the submerged breakwater.
~ Pelican on the move!
~Pelican splashdown!! (That was not easy to photograph)

Winyah Light  It took another 2 hours to wind our way from Winyah Inlet, cross the ICW, and then reach Georgetown. We are looking forward to exploring Georgetown for a day.

Winyah Light

It took another 2 hours to wind our way from Winyah Inlet, cross the ICW, and then reach Georgetown. We are looking forward to exploring Georgetown for a day.