Slogging to Savannah

I’m getting a little behind in my blog posts, so I will try to catch up bit by bit. We said goodbye to Charleston on Monday, October 26th. The night before we had a happy hour with Magnolia and Simple Life. We had first met Simple Life and her crew, Michele and Joe, in Chesapeake City on our 2013-2014 cruise. It was a treat to see them pull into the Maritime Center and say hello again.

Last night in Charleston Happy Hour with Magnolia (Anthony & Annette) and Simple Life (Joe & Michele) .

Last night in Charleston- Happy Hour with Magnolia (Anthony & Annette) and Simple Life (Joe & Michele) .

Our travels from Charleston to Savannah took two days, two dreary rainy days, which is why it felt like slogging was the correct descriptive word. But, it wasn’t all that bad because we were traveling with Magnolia again, which makes it fun as we chat back and forth on the VHF comparing notes on conditions.

An early departure meant another sun coming up behind us as we motored around the Battery in Charleston and up the Ashley River to the ICW.

An early departure meant another sun coming up behind us as we motored around the Battery in Charleston and up the Ashley River to the ICW.

Al noticed windblown roofs on these docks. They were all near one another which made AL wonder if they had all been constructed by the same company, and poorly at that.

Al noticed windblown roofs on these docks. They were all near one another which made Al  wonder if they had all been constructed by the same company, and poorly at that.

But, there was also some very windblown trees along the shore so perhaps there had been a strong blow through the region.

But, there was also some very windblown trees along the shore so perhaps there had been a strong blow through the region.

Another important milestone along the ICW - Mile 500, very close to this red marker 126. Once again, I think there should be a marker of some significance, like a big" 500."

Another important milestone along the ICW – Mile 500, very close to this red marker 126. Once again, I think there should be a marker of some significance, like a big” 500.”

A photo just to show the dreariness we were slogging through.

A photo just to show the dreariness we were slogging through. Pretty gray.

The waters were very high, from the high tide made higher by the full moon and the recent flooding in South Carolina. The edge of the ICW was difficult to determine - see how the marsh grasses barely show above the water line? And this green marker was almost under water.

The waters were very high, from the high tide made higher by the full moon and the recent flooding in South Carolina. The edge of the ICW was difficult to determine – see how the marsh grasses barely show above the water line? And this green marker with someone’s nest sitting upon it was almost under water. 

We anchored in a South Edisto River anchorage for the first night and even had dinner with Magnolia in spite of the rain. The next morning we headed towards Beaufort, South Carolina (pronounced Be-u-fort, not Bo-fort as in North Carolina) slogging again though gray clouds and rainy periods. In spite of that, there were still things of interest to notice.

A shrimper coming in the Port Royal inlet.

A shrimper coming in the Port Royal inlet. 

A duck blind. Through one stretch of marshland, we heard a lot of gunshots. Keeping our fingers crossed that we did not resemble a duck.

A duck blind. Through one stretch of marshland, we heard a lot of gunshots. Keeping our fingers crossed that we did not resemble a duck.

Ibis and pelicans

Ibis and pelicans

We continually had to pass through current line debris consisting of dried grasses carried in long lines. The current changed throughout the day, sometimes with us and sometimes against us, depending on where we were.

We continually had to pass through current line debris consisting of dried grasses carried in long lines. The current changed throughout the day, sometimes with us and sometimes against us, depending on where we were.

We anchored right off the ICW in the May River for the second night. A nice spot with dolphins swimming around.

Our route from South Edusto River, past Beaufort, stopping in the May River where we anchored right off the ICW for the second night.

The dolphins were all around us in this anchorage.

The dolphins were all around us in this anchorage.

You can see just how heavy the rain was at times - we could barely see Magnolia anchored nearby. Needless to say, we stayed on our own boats that evening!

You can see just how heavy the rain was at times – we could barely see Magnolia anchored nearby. Needless to say, we stayed on our own boats that evening!

Dark skies above Kindred Spirit as well.

Dark skies above Kindred Spirit as well.

Much to our surprise, the skies cleared enough for a rainbow before darkness came. Must be a good sign for the next day!!

Much to our surprise, the skies cleared enough for a rainbow before darkness descended . Hopefully this  a good omen for the next day. 

The full moon shines above us. I love the hatch over our heads - we could watch it just before we fell asleep.

The full moon shines above us. I love the hatch over our heads – we can look at the moon and stars as our eyes close and we nod off to sleep. 

The final day of travel to Savannah was a short one and much less gray. The skies were finally brightening. This is the where the ICW enters the Savannah River.

The final day of travel to Savannah was a short one and much less gray. The skies were finally brightening. This is the where the ICW enters the Savannah River.

On the other side of the Savannah River we arrived at our destination, a private dock in a friend’s community, right off the ICW in Savannah.

"Home" for the next 10 days (which will be another blog.)

“Home” for the next 10 days (which will be another blog.)

Our friends, Al and Lynn, also have a Mariner Orient 38, so you know that our conversations were all about those boats, AND Savannah.

Mariner Orient sister ships

Mariner Orient sister ships                                                                                                                             Left – Kindred Spirit in the foreground and Marisol across the way.                                                  Right – a closer look at Marisol.

“Magical and Mysterious” Cumberland Island, Georgia

We really wanted to go offshore for a long run when we left Beaufort/Ladys Island and head straight to St. Mary’s Georgia. We heard and read that the ICW in Georgia has not been as well-maintained as the other states, leaving shoaled areas. In Georgia, the ICW meanders, twisting and turning back and forth, making the trip much longer and probably more tedious. But, Mother Nature had other plans and sent some high winds and seas for our departure day. Rather than sit and wait for a good weather window, we set out in the ICW.  We made sure to plan our days around the tides so that we traveled the shallower sections on a higher or rising tide. We couldn’t do anything about the twists and turns, and it surely does twist, turn and meander. We also noticed that one cannot really plan around the currents to take advantage of them for the whole day. The current changes as you travel across inlets and in and out of rivers and creeks. It soon became a guessing game for us – so what do you think the current will be on that next section?? One moment we were moving along at over 8 knots, and the next we were slammed back to barely 4 knots, without changing the engine speed or adjusting any sail. Then, back up again to 7 or 8 knots.

That's a lot of current against  us!

That’s a lot of current against us!

Pelicans on every and any buoy!

Pelicans on every and any buoy!

After two days in Georgia’s ICW, we saw that the weather on Wednesday (Nov 6th) would be quieter and easy. We left St. Catherine’s Island and exited out Sapelo Sound just at sunrise.

Dawn, as we left the anchorage near St. Catherine's Island

Dawn, as we left the anchorage near St. Catherine’s Island

It was a good day to go outside and offshore!

It was a good day to go outside and offshore!

Although we thought we would only get to Jekyll Island, things went well, so we continued onto St. Mary’s Sound, the very last stop in Georgia. The Naval Submarine Base, Kings Bay, is located up the St. Mary’s River, so submarines go in and out of there quite often. We heard the Coast Guard telling boats to stay out of the channel long before we actually saw the submarine and its escorting ships. The “action” was in the distance, but I tried to get a few photos.

The escorting ship with the submarine

The submarine with BIG and small escorts

 

This smaller Coast Guard boat came speeding past us on its way back to the base.

This smaller Coast Guard boat came speeding past us on its way back to the base.

We anchored at the southern end of Cumberland Island just at dusk. Whew, made it!

Cumberland Island is Georgia’s largest barrier island, a national seashore, and a Congressionally designated wilderness. The maritime forests, undeveloped beaches, and saltwater marshes are home to many species, including wild horses, turkeys, armadillos, sea turtles, and many birds. The human inhabitants span centuries – natives, missionaries, Spanish, French, and English explorers, enslaved African Americans, plantation owners, and wealthy industrialists, the Carnegies.

There are still about 3 dozen island residents, but, as a National Park, visitors are restricted to 300 per day. The only access is by the ferry which runs twice each day, or by private boat. People can hike, bike, camp, but cannot bring cars.

"Sea Camp" where the ferries dock and the tours begin. ~ Al relaxes and rocks on the porch

“Sea Camp” where the ferries dock and the tours begin.
~ Al relaxes and rocks on the porch

We really wanted to take the Land and Legacy Tour, a six-hour trip by van over the dirt roads. No room on our first day, so we set out to explore the southern end of the island on our own. Another cruising couple, Curt and Cindy (Classic Cyn) joined us on our hike.

Beautiful sandy paths under our feet and Spanish moss swaying above our heads

Beautiful sandy paths under our feet and Spanish moss swaying above our heads

Approaching the sandy beaches

Approaching the sandy beaches

The trees are incredible! Twisting limbs that reach out and ask to be climbed.

The trees are incredible! Twisting limbs that reach out and ask to be climbed.

It is hard to capture in a photo, but the winds and waves were fierce. Not at all like the day before.

It is hard to capture in a photo, but the winds and waves were fierce. Not at all like the day before.

~Shells tumbled across the sand ~Big and baby horseshoe crab shells

~Shells tumbled across the sand
~Big and baby horseshoe crab shells

We were so thrilled to see  wild horses as we walked back from the beach. There are about 150 horses on the island. They may be wild, but they pay no attention as you walk by. People are reminded that these are wild horses and should not be touched.

Wild horses of Cumberland Island

Wild horses of Cumberland Island

And there was this wild turkey strutting his stuff down the path

And there was this wild turkey strutting his stuff down the path

After the beach hike, we hiked to the ruins of Dungeness. In the 1880s Thomas Carnegie,  (brother of steel magnate, Andrew Carnegie) and his wife Lucy bought land on Cumberland to build a winter retreat. Carnegie did not live to see it finished, but Lucy and their nine children continued to live on the island, in their mansion Dungeness, a 59-room “Scottish castle.” The last event at Dungeness was the 1929 wedding of a Carnegie daughter. After the Crash and the Depression, the family left the island and the mansion was left vacant. It burned in a 1959 fire.

Even the ruined remains of Dungeness are impressive

Even the ruined remains of Dungeness are impressive

One of the most curious things around the grounds of Dungeness was the cluster of rusting autos, just abandoned there.

Old autos left to rust (rest?) on the grounds near Dungeness

Old autos left to rust (rest?) on the grounds near Dungeness

Can you figure out the model of the car???

Can you figure out the model of the car???

On the next day, we tried to take the Lands and Legacy Tour again.  No luck when we called for a reservation, but we hoped that someone might not show up. Alas, it wasn’t meant to be. The park ranger must have felt sorry for the four of us, so he showed us on the map how we could get to the north end of the island by using our dinghies. He showed us the route and where we might leave the dinghies. If we made it in time, we could join his tour group at “The Settlement.” We thought this was a great idea! Hopped in our dinghies, brought extra gas, our pb&j sandwiches, and off we went.

Are you familiar with the phrase, “not to scale”? The little land map we had wasn’t really quite enough for our trip by water. We went through the salt marshes, winding back and forth, just like a maze. If it weren’t for my iPhone, we might still be lost in those grassy waters! It took us almost 90 minutes, and we were moving at a good speed. Afterwards, we figured out that we had dinghied about 15 miles one way.  Then, we could not find the spot the ranger had described for landing the dinghies. In desperation, we went around a little corner and found a tiny beach near the edge. Walking up into the woods, we found a sandy path and began to follow it. It soon became a sandy road that looked like it was traveled. Certainly by horses because they left “evidence” all along it. Eventually we found (or was that stumbled upon?) “The Settlement.”

The Spanish moss canopy above our heads

The Spanish moss canopy above our heads

In the 1890s, “The Settlement” was established at the north end of the island as a residential area for black workers, as Georgia had passed laws requiring racial segregation of housing and public facilities. The First African Baptist Church, established in The Settlement in 1893, was rebuilt in the 1930s. It is one of the few remaining structures of this community. Hollis, the Park Ranger, was in the church with his tour group. As we entered the back of the little chapel, he looked quite surprised to see us! Evidently, he did not expect we would really try to get here by boat. Really?
This tiny little church was where John F. Kennedy , Jr. married Carolyn Bessette in a private secret ceremony with only 40 guests. John’ s college roommate was a Carnegie and had spent time here on Cumberland Island over the years.

The First African Baptist Church, Cumberland Island

The First African Baptist Church, Cumberland Island

 

The

The interior of the  little church

~The church bell  ~ Hollis describing the the history of the church and Kennedy wedding  ~ Supposedly, the natural wood cross was never there until after the Kennedy wedding

~The church bell
~ Hollis telling stories, describing the the history of the church and Kennedy wedding
~ Supposedly, the natural wood cross was never there until after the Kennedy wedding

Hollis also told about Jimmy Carter’s friendship with Robert Rischarde, a Cumberland resident. Carter visited the island many times and learned to appreciate environmental issues through this friendship.

Robert Rischarde's house

Robert Rischarde’s house

Hollis also told stories about a local Gullah Geechee woman, Beulah Alberty, who both befriended and helped fellow neighbors, but also cursed them at other times. He says that Jimmy Carter wrote poetry about a “Beulah” ……. Officially, Beulah took care of the church in the 1950s and ’60s as its secretary and as “the mother of the church.”

~Beulah's house ~colorful interior walls

~Beulah’s house
~colorful interior walls

On our way back to the dinghies, we took the path that led to the HIgh Point Cemetery. It is actually several different little areas, enclosed by brick walls (built by Beulah) or by black fencing.

High Point Cemetery, Cumberland Island

High Point Cemetery, Cumberland Island

Would we recommend or repeat this little adventure? Probably not. Are we glad we did it? You bet!
There is still much to see on Cumberland Island, and we would like to stop there again on our trip north in the spring. There truly is a sense of mystery and magic to the island that is unlike anywhere we have ever been. The mixture of nature, culture, history, without the typical tourism, is unusual. It is best described on the Cumberland Island website —
“The greatest and most lasting value of the Island is its ability to change us. It is a place of transformation. It is this intangible feature that seems to be the most important benefit which Cumberland Island has for its guests. This spiritual quality is what, year after year, its visitors, residents, and Park Service employees seem to believe is its most important contribution to our people.”

Salt marshes and Spanish moss

Salt marshes and Spanish moss